EFFECT OF PLATELET-ACTIVATING FACTOR ON OSTEOCLASTS

Project: Research project

Description

Periodontal disease is an inflammatory process characterized by vascular
dilation, increased microvascular permeability, migration and
infiltration of inflammatory cells. These events may result in eventual
loss of periodontal attachment. Bone resorption in periodontitis is due
to an increased activity of osteoclasts. Recently, a very potent
mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF, PAF-acether,
AGEPC), has been discovered. In other systems, PAF has been shown to
produce almost all of the underlying characteristic lesions observed
periodontal disease. However, its role in the development of the
periodontal disease has note been studied. It is our hypothesis that
PAF is involved in activation of osteoclasts leading to bone resorption
and progressive destruction of structures supporting the tooth. IN
order to test our hypothesis, we will do the following: 1. We will examine the effect of PAF and selective antagonists of PAF
receptors in vitro on bone resorption capacity of osteoclasts which will
be isolated in primary cultures, and 2. We will identify and characterize PAF receptors on osteoclasts. These studies will be a definitive test of the effect of PAF on bone
resorptive capacity of osteoclasts under in vitro conditions.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/8912/31/90

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health

Fingerprint

Platelet Activating Factor
Osteoclasts
Bone Resorption
Periodontium
Periodontitis
Capillary Permeability
Periodontal Diseases
Inflammation
Bone and Bones
In Vitro Techniques