A critique of fuzzy rational choice models

Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, William J. Tastle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The rational choice model developed for economics has been adopted by the political science communtity. Unfortunately the rational choice model does not seem to be as applicable to political situations as it is to economic situations. Reasonable models lead to undesirable conclusions, as exemplified by Arrows theorem, which uses for reasonable axioms to conclude that dictatorship is inevitable. Of course, the axioms used have come under comprehensive analysis, and weaknesses have been shown, however, none of the axioms are blatantly unrealistic. Most are quite reasonable. Researchers have tried using fuzzy rational choice functions to get around Arrow, to produce a model of choice that is reasonable but non-dictatorial. However, the methodology used is often straightforward fuzzification of crisp concepts. This paper argues that these concepts really do not translate as well as one would like.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012 - Berkeley, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2012Aug 8 2012

Other

Other2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBerkeley, CA
Period8/6/128/8/12

Fingerprint

Choice Models
Axioms
Economics
Choice Function
Rational function
Rational functions
Methodology
Theorem
Model
Concepts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Wierman, M. J., Clark, T. D., Mordeson, J. N., & Tastle, W. J. (2012). A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. In 2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012 [6291006] https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2012.6291006

A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. / Wierman, Mark J.; Clark, Terry D.; Mordeson, John N.; Tastle, William J.

2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012. 2012. 6291006.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wierman, MJ, Clark, TD, Mordeson, JN & Tastle, WJ 2012, A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. in 2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012., 6291006, 2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012, Berkeley, CA, United States, 8/6/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2012.6291006
Wierman MJ, Clark TD, Mordeson JN, Tastle WJ. A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. In 2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012. 2012. 6291006 https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2012.6291006
Wierman, Mark J. ; Clark, Terry D. ; Mordeson, John N. ; Tastle, William J. / A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. 2012 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, NAFIPS 2012. 2012.
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