A review of pediatric bacterial meningitis

Amy Pick, Desirae C. Sweet, Kimberley J. Begley

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Pediatric bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency requiring immediate initiation of treatment. Although the United States and other developed countries have seen a decline in pediatric meningitis, bacterial meningitis continues to cause high morbidity and mortality globally. Vaccinations (Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal, and meningococcal) have significantly reduced the risk of bacterial meningitis in developed countries. The treatment of bacterial meningitis depends on the suspected or known causative organism. Treatment often incorporates a third-generation cephalosporin or penicillin plus vancomycin. Dexamethasone may be added to prevent neurologic sequelae such as hearing loss. Despite aggressive therapy, many patients will experience long-term neurologic complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages41-45
Number of pages5
Volume41
No5
Specialist publicationU.S. Pharmacist
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Bacterial Meningitides
Audition
Cephalosporins
Vancomycin
Developed Countries
Penicillins
Dexamethasone
Nervous System
Haemophilus influenzae type b
Therapeutics
Hearing Loss
Meningitis
Vaccination
Emergencies
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacy

Cite this

A review of pediatric bacterial meningitis. / Pick, Amy; Sweet, Desirae C.; Begley, Kimberley J.

In: U.S. Pharmacist, Vol. 41, No. 5, 01.05.2016, p. 41-45.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Pick, Amy ; Sweet, Desirae C. ; Begley, Kimberley J. / A review of pediatric bacterial meningitis. In: U.S. Pharmacist. 2016 ; Vol. 41, No. 5. pp. 41-45.
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