A survey of compliance

Medicaid's mandated blood lead screenings for children age 12-18 months in Nebraska

Marlene Wilken, Sarah Currier, Carla Abel-Zieg, Linda A. Brady

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To determine the frequency of Medicaid mandated blood lead level (BLL) screening compliance rates by clinical site. Methods: Retrospective chart review for evidence of BLLs. Data analyses were conducted using frequencies, percentages & chi-square. Results: The overall incidence of documented BLLs was 78.9% with one clinic demonstrating 100% BLLs while the others had 72%. Screening rates differed significantly by clinical site (X 2 = 18.460, df = 3, p <0.001). Conclusion: Although universal blood lead screening is mandated, there were missed opportunities to obtain BLLs in 21.1% of the records reviewed. Only one clinic had 100% documentation of BLLs when children on Medicaid were seen between the ages of 12-18 months.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2004

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Medicaid
Compliance
Documentation
Incidence
Lead
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A survey of compliance : Medicaid's mandated blood lead screenings for children age 12-18 months in Nebraska. / Wilken, Marlene; Currier, Sarah; Abel-Zieg, Carla; Brady, Linda A.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 4, 1, 23.02.2004, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Background: To determine the frequency of Medicaid mandated blood lead level (BLL) screening compliance rates by clinical site. Methods: Retrospective chart review for evidence of BLLs. Data analyses were conducted using frequencies, percentages & chi-square. Results: The overall incidence of documented BLLs was 78.9{\%} with one clinic demonstrating 100{\%} BLLs while the others had 72{\%}. Screening rates differed significantly by clinical site (X 2 = 18.460, df = 3, p <0.001). Conclusion: Although universal blood lead screening is mandated, there were missed opportunities to obtain BLLs in 21.1{\%} of the records reviewed. Only one clinic had 100{\%} documentation of BLLs when children on Medicaid were seen between the ages of 12-18 months.",
author = "Marlene Wilken and Sarah Currier and Carla Abel-Zieg and Brady, {Linda A.}",
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AU - Brady, Linda A.

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AB - Background: To determine the frequency of Medicaid mandated blood lead level (BLL) screening compliance rates by clinical site. Methods: Retrospective chart review for evidence of BLLs. Data analyses were conducted using frequencies, percentages & chi-square. Results: The overall incidence of documented BLLs was 78.9% with one clinic demonstrating 100% BLLs while the others had 72%. Screening rates differed significantly by clinical site (X 2 = 18.460, df = 3, p <0.001). Conclusion: Although universal blood lead screening is mandated, there were missed opportunities to obtain BLLs in 21.1% of the records reviewed. Only one clinic had 100% documentation of BLLs when children on Medicaid were seen between the ages of 12-18 months.

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