Absorbability and utility of calcium in mineral waters

Robert P. Heaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Calcium intake in North America remains substantially below recommended amounts. Bottled waters high in calcium could help close that gap. Objectives: The objectives were to summarize and integrate published absorbability and biodynamic data concerning high-calcium mineral waters and to combine these data with hitherto unpublished analyses from my laboratory. Design: The usual library database was searched. The absorbability of calcium from a high-mineral water labeled with tracer quantities of 45Ca was measured in human volunteers as a part of an otherwise low-calcium test meal. Published reports that used differing load sizes and meal conditions were harmonized by making corrections based on published calcium absorbability data. Results: All the high-calcium mineral waters had absorbabilities equal to milk calcium or slightly better. When tested, all produced biodynamic responses indicative of absorption of appreciable quantities of calcium (ie, increased urinary calcium, decreased serum parathyroid hormone, decreased bone resorption biomarkers, and protection of bone mass). Conclusion: High-calcium mineral waters could provide useful quantities of bioavailable calcium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-374
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume84
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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Mineral Waters
mineral water
Calcium
calcium
Meals
bottled water
Calcium Carbonate
test meals
bone resorption
parathyroid hormone
Bone Resorption
North America
Parathyroid Hormone
Drinking Water
Libraries
Volunteers
volunteers
tracer techniques
biomarkers
Biomarkers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Absorbability and utility of calcium in mineral waters. / Heaney, Robert P.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 84, No. 2, 01.08.2006, p. 371-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heaney, Robert P. / Absorbability and utility of calcium in mineral waters. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006 ; Vol. 84, No. 2. pp. 371-374.
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