Advances in osteoporosis from 1970 to 2018

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 1970, there were no drugs under study for osteoporosis. Estrogen was used, but little was known about the correct dose for preventing bone loss. At that time, fractures were not even recognized as a disease, but regarded as part of normal aging. From 1970 to this year (2018), there have been extensive advances in the osteoporosis field ranging from fracture epidemiology to the remarkable invention of bone density measurements. There have been major advances in therapeutic options available for patients for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. In parallel, the advances in the laboratory helped elucidate the process of bone remodeling, not only at the macroscopic level but also at the cellular level. This led to rapid advances in translational research from cellular biology to new therapies exemplified by the development of monoclonal antibodies for osteoporosis. Further understanding of the signaling pathways in bone cells will lead to new small molecules made for osteoporosis treatment, perhaps causing less adverse events. University-based research throughout the world has been a leader in most of these advances, and Pharma support for phase 1 to 4 studies helped bring these discoveries to patients. In the osteoporosis field alone, one sees the tremendous value of grant support for university research by National funding agencies such as the National Institute of Health in this country and similar agencies in other countries. There are clinical challenges that have to be solved with long-term compliance with osteoporosis medication if we want to reduce fracture incidence in the long term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1403-1417
Number of pages15
JournalMenopause (New York, N.Y.)
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Osteoporosis
Bone and Bones
Translational Medical Research
Organized Financing
Bone Remodeling
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Therapeutics
Research
Bone Density
Cell Biology
Estrogens
Epidemiology
Monoclonal Antibodies
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Advances in osteoporosis from 1970 to 2018. / Gallagher, John Christopher G.

In: Menopause (New York, N.Y.), Vol. 25, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1403-1417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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