Aggregate health care expenditure in the United States

Evidence from cointegration tests

Vasudeva N. R. Murthy, Victor Ukpolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unlike recent studies that are based on international cross-sectional series, this paper attempts to quantify the role of the determinants of aggregate health care expenditure per capita, using time-series data for the period of 1960-87 for the United States. The paper applies the relatively new procedures of unit root testing, cointegration and error-correction modelling. The evidence supports cointegration. Although, the results indicate that per capita income, age of the population, number of practising physicians, and public financing of health care are important determinants, the age structure of the population and number of practising physicians emerge as the major determinants of aggregate health care expenditure in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-802
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Economics
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Cointegration test
Health care expenditures
Physicians
Cointegration
Per capita income
Age structure
Time series data
Financing
Error correction
Unit root testing
Modeling
Healthcare

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Aggregate health care expenditure in the United States : Evidence from cointegration tests. / Murthy, Vasudeva N. R.; Ukpolo, Victor.

In: Applied Economics, Vol. 26, No. 8, 1994, p. 797-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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