Allograft AlloDerm® tissue for laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal groin hernia repair

A case report

Bardia Amirlak, Jodi Gerdes, Varun Puri, Robert Joseph Fitzgibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Synthetic mesh is the prosthetic material used for most inguinal hernioplasties. However, when left in contact with intra-abdominal viscera, it often becomes associated with infection and migration, particularly in irradiated tissues, contaminated fields, immunosuppressed individuals, and patients with intestinal obstruction or fistula. AlloDerm® Regenerative Tissue Matrix (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) is derived from human cadaver skin and may be associated with fewer visceral adhesions and more durability in infected fields than synthetic mesh. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the first case in which AlloDerm was used in a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal repair of a multiple recurrent right inguinal hernia, a left femoral hernia, and an umbilical hernia in the same patient. Use of AlloDerm greatly enhanced the maneuverability during laparoscopic hernia repair due to its pliability and strength and eliminated the need to cover the prosthetic with peritoneum. DISCUSSION Previous pelvic radiation and multiple previous groin repairs can render the peritoneum friable, resulting in obstacles to successful closure. AlloDerm is a reasonable choice for groin hernia repairs when such factors are present. CONCLUSION The long-term durability of AlloDerm for laparoscopic groin hernia repairs is yet to be determined, but based on current data it seems prudent to use this technique in laparoscopic repair of complex groin hernias where infection is suspected or inadequate prosthetic coverage with peritoneum is anticipated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-297
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Groin
Herniorrhaphy
Allografts
Peritoneum
Femoral Hernia
Intestinal Fistula
Umbilical Hernia
Viscera
Inguinal Hernia
Intestinal Obstruction
Hernia
Infection
Cadaver
Pliability
Alloderm
Radiation
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Allograft AlloDerm® tissue for laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal groin hernia repair : A case report. / Amirlak, Bardia; Gerdes, Jodi; Puri, Varun; Fitzgibbons, Robert Joseph.

In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, Vol. 5, No. 6, 2014, p. 294-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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