American Indian Policy in the States

Richard C. Witmer, Joshua Johnson, Frederick J. Boehmke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We investigate whether American Indian legislation is prevalent in state legislative agendas. Methods: We examine proposed and passed legislation in states for the years 1998-2007. Results: Our findings suggest that states with legislative and executive institutions that address Native issues, as well as larger American Indian constituencies, are more likely to initiate and pass American Indian legislation. We also find that states with larger legislative agendas propose and pass more Native legislations, although the amount of Native legislation has been dropping in recent years. Conclusion: Native legislation is on the state policy agenda and both Indian Nations and state governments influence the size of the Native policy agenda.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1043-1063
Number of pages21
JournalSocial Science Quarterly
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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American Indian
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  • Social Sciences(all)

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American Indian Policy in the States. / Witmer, Richard C.; Johnson, Joshua; Boehmke, Frederick J.

In: Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 95, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 1043-1063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Witmer, RC, Johnson, J & Boehmke, FJ 2014, 'American Indian Policy in the States', Social Science Quarterly, vol. 95, no. 4, pp. 1043-1063. https://doi.org/10.1111/ssqu.12086
Witmer, Richard C. ; Johnson, Joshua ; Boehmke, Frederick J. / American Indian Policy in the States. In: Social Science Quarterly. 2014 ; Vol. 95, No. 4. pp. 1043-1063.
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