Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin

M. Rendell, G. Kao, P. Mecherikunnel, B. Petersen, R. Duhaney, J. Nierenberg, K. Rasbold, D. Klenk, P. K. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Two techniques originally developed for measurement of glycated ('glycosylated') hemoglobin but also applicable to determination of glycated albumin are the thiobarbituric acid colorimetric technique (I) and the aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatographic procedure (II). The latter reliably distinguishes diabetics from nondiabetics, and concentrations of glycated hemoglobin and glycated albumin are linearly correlated. I is nonspecific; it neither correlates with diabetic status nor with values derived via the affinity technique. Most of the chromogenic material is present in the fraction of albumin that does not bind to aminophenylboronic acid. Glucose interferes significantly with I but only slightly with II. Prolonged incubation of plasma with glucose dramatically increases the II-determined glycated albumin. Reactivity with thiobarbituric acid increases much less, and mainly in the II-bound fraction. This fraction contains a high proportion of nonspecifically reactive material. The percentage of glycated albumin determined in crude plasma samples by II differs only slightly from the value determined by purifying the albumin from the plasma. This technique appears more promising than I for eventual clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-234
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume31
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Colorimetry
Affinity chromatography
Affinity Chromatography
Albumins
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Chromogenics
Plasmas
Glucose
Serum Albumin
3-aminobenzeneboronic acid
thiobarbituric acid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Rendell, M., Kao, G., Mecherikunnel, P., Petersen, B., Duhaney, R., Nierenberg, J., ... Smith, P. K. (1985). Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin. Clinical Chemistry, 31(2), 229-234.

Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin. / Rendell, M.; Kao, G.; Mecherikunnel, P.; Petersen, B.; Duhaney, R.; Nierenberg, J.; Rasbold, K.; Klenk, D.; Smith, P. K.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 31, No. 2, 1985, p. 229-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rendell, M, Kao, G, Mecherikunnel, P, Petersen, B, Duhaney, R, Nierenberg, J, Rasbold, K, Klenk, D & Smith, PK 1985, 'Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin', Clinical Chemistry, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 229-234.
Rendell M, Kao G, Mecherikunnel P, Petersen B, Duhaney R, Nierenberg J et al. Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin. Clinical Chemistry. 1985;31(2):229-234.
Rendell, M. ; Kao, G. ; Mecherikunnel, P. ; Petersen, B. ; Duhaney, R. ; Nierenberg, J. ; Rasbold, K. ; Klenk, D. ; Smith, P. K. / Aminophenylboronic acid affinity chromatography and thiobarbituric acid colorimetry compared for measuring glycated albumin. In: Clinical Chemistry. 1985 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 229-234.
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