Amniotic fluid embolism: Historical perspectives & new possibilities

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe that occurs suddenly and without warning. AFE is a condition that is poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, but has a high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since it was first described in 1926, the underlying pathophysiology has eluded researchers and clinicians. While a new understanding of the syndrome has emerged with the advent of a national registry in the 1980s, recommendations for diagnostic methods and treatment in the acute phase of the event remain unclear.The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a historical look at the phenomenon of AFE, a description of its suspected pathophysiology, and recommendations for nursing interventions. A review of data from the national registry and other classic studies are included.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-85
Number of pages8
JournalMCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Amniotic Fluid Embolism
Registries
Infant Mortality
Obstetrics
Nursing
Mothers
Research Personnel
Morbidity
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Amniotic fluid embolism : Historical perspectives & new possibilities. / Schoening, Anne M.

In: MCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2006, p. 78-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{d7674dd5d6de4850babcbf8977148eb7,
title = "Amniotic fluid embolism: Historical perspectives & new possibilities",
abstract = "Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe that occurs suddenly and without warning. AFE is a condition that is poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, but has a high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since it was first described in 1926, the underlying pathophysiology has eluded researchers and clinicians. While a new understanding of the syndrome has emerged with the advent of a national registry in the 1980s, recommendations for diagnostic methods and treatment in the acute phase of the event remain unclear.The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a historical look at the phenomenon of AFE, a description of its suspected pathophysiology, and recommendations for nursing interventions. A review of data from the national registry and other classic studies are included.",
author = "Schoening, {Anne M.}",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1097/00005721-200603000-00004",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "78--85",
journal = "MCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing",
issn = "0361-929X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amniotic fluid embolism

T2 - Historical perspectives & new possibilities

AU - Schoening, Anne M.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe that occurs suddenly and without warning. AFE is a condition that is poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, but has a high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since it was first described in 1926, the underlying pathophysiology has eluded researchers and clinicians. While a new understanding of the syndrome has emerged with the advent of a national registry in the 1980s, recommendations for diagnostic methods and treatment in the acute phase of the event remain unclear.The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a historical look at the phenomenon of AFE, a description of its suspected pathophysiology, and recommendations for nursing interventions. A review of data from the national registry and other classic studies are included.

AB - Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe that occurs suddenly and without warning. AFE is a condition that is poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, but has a high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since it was first described in 1926, the underlying pathophysiology has eluded researchers and clinicians. While a new understanding of the syndrome has emerged with the advent of a national registry in the 1980s, recommendations for diagnostic methods and treatment in the acute phase of the event remain unclear.The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a historical look at the phenomenon of AFE, a description of its suspected pathophysiology, and recommendations for nursing interventions. A review of data from the national registry and other classic studies are included.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646116321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646116321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00005721-200603000-00004

DO - 10.1097/00005721-200603000-00004

M3 - Review article

C2 - 16523030

AN - SCOPUS:33646116321

VL - 31

SP - 78

EP - 85

JO - MCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing

JF - MCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing

SN - 0361-929X

IS - 2

ER -