App Use in Psychiatric Education: A Medical Student Survey

Cecilia Lau, Venkata Kolli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study is to understand and appraise app use by medical students during their clerkships. Methods: Following Creighton University IRB approval, a voluntary and anonymous paper-based, 15-question survey was distributed to third-year medical students. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Results: Of 112 medical students available, 76.7% (86) participated in the survey. All participants owned a smartphone or tablet with 84.9% using Apple iOS, followed by 12.8% using Android platform. Students reported using the fewest number of apps during surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology clerkships. The largest number of apps were used during the internal medicine rotation (70.3%). The three most popular apps were Epocrates, UpToDate, and UWorld. The most common uses for these apps were as references during the clerkship, followed by improving knowledge, and test taking. Perceived major benefits included accessibility (96% of student respondents) and interactivity (39.5%). Common apps used during the psychiatry clerkship included UpToDate (71%), Epocrates (51%), and Medscape (43%). Despite less frequent app use during their psychiatry clerkship, 90% felt there was a utility for educational apps in psychiatric education. Conclusions: Consistent with the previous literature on medical students preferring educational apps, students suggest developers focus on question bank-type apps, followed by clinical support-focused and self-directed case-based learning apps for psychiatry clerkship learning. Educators should factor these modes of educational delivery into future educational app development. This survey shows a high degree of smartphone and tablet use among medical students, and they attest to mobile phone app utility in psychiatric education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-70
Number of pages3
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Medical Students
Psychiatry
medical student
psychiatry
Education
education
Students
Tablets
gynecology
Obstetric Surgical Procedures
Mobile Applications
Learning
student
obstetrics
interactive media
Cell Phones
Research Ethics Committees
surgery
learning
Malus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

App Use in Psychiatric Education : A Medical Student Survey. / Lau, Cecilia; Kolli, Venkata.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 68-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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