Benign chronic pain: 18-Month to ten-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary pain unit treatment program

P. W. Meilman, F. M. Skultety, Thomas Guck, K. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty-six chronic pain patients were personally interviewed 18 months to 10 years after treatment in a multidisciplinary pain program. Compared to pretreatment data, there were significant decreases in medication use, hospitalizations, surgeries, pain levels, litigation, and compensation. Significantly more patients were employed at follow-up. Patients rated their disability, activity level, and ability to meet social and recreational needs as improved, even though adherence to the treatment program following discharge was poor. Only 25% of the subjects still consulted physicians for their pain problems. Multivariate analysis of admission MMPI scores indicated no significant differences between the successfully and unsuccessfully treated groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume1
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Pain
Pain
MMPI
Aptitude
Jurisprudence
Compensation and Redress
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Multivariate Analysis
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Benign chronic pain : 18-Month to ten-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary pain unit treatment program. / Meilman, P. W.; Skultety, F. M.; Guck, Thomas; Sullivan, K.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 1, No. 3, 1985, p. 131-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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