Beyond a code of ethics

Phenomenological ethics for everyday practice

Bruce Greenfield, Gail Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical therapy, like all health-care professions, governs itself through a code of ethics that defines its obligations of professional behaviours. The code of ethics provides professions with a consistent and common moral language and principled guidelines for ethical actions. Yet, and as argued in this paper, professional codes of ethics have limits applied to ethical decision-making in the presence of ethical dilemmas. Part of the limitations of the codes of ethics is that there is no particular hierarchy of principles that govern in all situations. Instead, the exigencies of clinical practice, the particularities of individual patient's illness experiences and the transformative nature of chronic illnesses and disabilities often obscure the ethical concerns and issues embedded in concrete situations. Consistent with models of expert practice, and with contemporary models of patient-centred care, we advocate and describe in this paper a type of interpretative and narrative approach to moral practice and ethical decision-making based on phenomenology. The tools of phenomenology that are well defined in research are applied and examined in a case that illustrates their use in uncovering the values and ethical concerns of a patient. Based on the deconstruction of this case on a phenomenologist approach, we illustrate how such approaches for ethical understanding can help assist clinicians and educators in applying principles within the context and needs of each patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalPhysiotherapy Research International
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Codes of Ethics
Ethics
Decision Making
Patient-Centered Care
Health Occupations
Chronic Disease
Language
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Beyond a code of ethics : Phenomenological ethics for everyday practice. / Greenfield, Bruce; Jensen, Gail.

In: Physiotherapy Research International, Vol. 15, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 88-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{12e09ac0a7f14cff8fc8519877bb3c36,
title = "Beyond a code of ethics: Phenomenological ethics for everyday practice",
abstract = "Physical therapy, like all health-care professions, governs itself through a code of ethics that defines its obligations of professional behaviours. The code of ethics provides professions with a consistent and common moral language and principled guidelines for ethical actions. Yet, and as argued in this paper, professional codes of ethics have limits applied to ethical decision-making in the presence of ethical dilemmas. Part of the limitations of the codes of ethics is that there is no particular hierarchy of principles that govern in all situations. Instead, the exigencies of clinical practice, the particularities of individual patient's illness experiences and the transformative nature of chronic illnesses and disabilities often obscure the ethical concerns and issues embedded in concrete situations. Consistent with models of expert practice, and with contemporary models of patient-centred care, we advocate and describe in this paper a type of interpretative and narrative approach to moral practice and ethical decision-making based on phenomenology. The tools of phenomenology that are well defined in research are applied and examined in a case that illustrates their use in uncovering the values and ethical concerns of a patient. Based on the deconstruction of this case on a phenomenologist approach, we illustrate how such approaches for ethical understanding can help assist clinicians and educators in applying principles within the context and needs of each patient.",
author = "Bruce Greenfield and Gail Jensen",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1002/pri.481",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "88--95",
journal = "Physiotherapy Research International",
issn = "1358-2267",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Beyond a code of ethics

T2 - Phenomenological ethics for everyday practice

AU - Greenfield, Bruce

AU - Jensen, Gail

PY - 2010/6

Y1 - 2010/6

N2 - Physical therapy, like all health-care professions, governs itself through a code of ethics that defines its obligations of professional behaviours. The code of ethics provides professions with a consistent and common moral language and principled guidelines for ethical actions. Yet, and as argued in this paper, professional codes of ethics have limits applied to ethical decision-making in the presence of ethical dilemmas. Part of the limitations of the codes of ethics is that there is no particular hierarchy of principles that govern in all situations. Instead, the exigencies of clinical practice, the particularities of individual patient's illness experiences and the transformative nature of chronic illnesses and disabilities often obscure the ethical concerns and issues embedded in concrete situations. Consistent with models of expert practice, and with contemporary models of patient-centred care, we advocate and describe in this paper a type of interpretative and narrative approach to moral practice and ethical decision-making based on phenomenology. The tools of phenomenology that are well defined in research are applied and examined in a case that illustrates their use in uncovering the values and ethical concerns of a patient. Based on the deconstruction of this case on a phenomenologist approach, we illustrate how such approaches for ethical understanding can help assist clinicians and educators in applying principles within the context and needs of each patient.

AB - Physical therapy, like all health-care professions, governs itself through a code of ethics that defines its obligations of professional behaviours. The code of ethics provides professions with a consistent and common moral language and principled guidelines for ethical actions. Yet, and as argued in this paper, professional codes of ethics have limits applied to ethical decision-making in the presence of ethical dilemmas. Part of the limitations of the codes of ethics is that there is no particular hierarchy of principles that govern in all situations. Instead, the exigencies of clinical practice, the particularities of individual patient's illness experiences and the transformative nature of chronic illnesses and disabilities often obscure the ethical concerns and issues embedded in concrete situations. Consistent with models of expert practice, and with contemporary models of patient-centred care, we advocate and describe in this paper a type of interpretative and narrative approach to moral practice and ethical decision-making based on phenomenology. The tools of phenomenology that are well defined in research are applied and examined in a case that illustrates their use in uncovering the values and ethical concerns of a patient. Based on the deconstruction of this case on a phenomenologist approach, we illustrate how such approaches for ethical understanding can help assist clinicians and educators in applying principles within the context and needs of each patient.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956122420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956122420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pri.481

DO - 10.1002/pri.481

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 88

EP - 95

JO - Physiotherapy Research International

JF - Physiotherapy Research International

SN - 1358-2267

IS - 2

ER -