Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode

Soshi Suzuki, Toshiki Takamizawa, Arisa Imai, Akimasa Tsujimoto, Keiichi Sai, Masayuki Takimoto, Wayne W. Barkmeier, Mark A. Latta, Masashi Miyazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Materials and methods: Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. Results: The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Conclusions: Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. Clinical relevance: The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Oral Investigations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 31 2017

Fingerprint

Dental Enamel
Adhesives
Shear Strength
Hot Temperature
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Suzuki, S., Takamizawa, T., Imai, A., Tsujimoto, A., Sai, K., Takimoto, M., ... Miyazaki, M. (Accepted/In press). Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode. Clinical Oral Investigations, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2196-x

Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode. / Suzuki, Soshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Sai, Keiichi; Takimoto, Masayuki; Barkmeier, Wayne W.; Latta, Mark A.; Miyazaki, Masashi.

In: Clinical Oral Investigations, 31.08.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, Soshi ; Takamizawa, Toshiki ; Imai, Arisa ; Tsujimoto, Akimasa ; Sai, Keiichi ; Takimoto, Masayuki ; Barkmeier, Wayne W. ; Latta, Mark A. ; Miyazaki, Masashi. / Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode. In: Clinical Oral Investigations. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.
@article{e808e60b00654ff89e46df965631b9fa,
title = "Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode",
abstract = "Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Materials and methods: Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. Results: The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Conclusions: Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. Clinical relevance: The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.",
author = "Soshi Suzuki and Toshiki Takamizawa and Arisa Imai and Akimasa Tsujimoto and Keiichi Sai and Masayuki Takimoto and Barkmeier, {Wayne W.} and Latta, {Mark A.} and Masashi Miyazaki",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1007/s00784-017-2196-x",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Clinical Oral Investigations",
issn = "1432-6981",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode

AU - Suzuki, Soshi

AU - Takamizawa, Toshiki

AU - Imai, Arisa

AU - Tsujimoto, Akimasa

AU - Sai, Keiichi

AU - Takimoto, Masayuki

AU - Barkmeier, Wayne W.

AU - Latta, Mark A.

AU - Miyazaki, Masashi

PY - 2017/8/31

Y1 - 2017/8/31

N2 - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Materials and methods: Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. Results: The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Conclusions: Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. Clinical relevance: The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

AB - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Materials and methods: Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. Results: The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Conclusions: Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. Clinical relevance: The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028747710&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028747710&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00784-017-2196-x

DO - 10.1007/s00784-017-2196-x

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Clinical Oral Investigations

JF - Clinical Oral Investigations

SN - 1432-6981

ER -