Breast Cancer Genetics and Cancer Control

Tumor Association

Henry T. Lynch, Jane Lynch, Pat Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Verified breast cancer was present in a father, his mother, and his daughter. His son had a brain tumor (by history) and his grandson, (the son of the affected daughter), had a histologically verified rhabdomyosarcoma. This familial aggregation of cancers (except for leukemia, which is absent) is consistent with a newly described familial breast cancer syndrome. A single pleiotropic, dominantly transmitted gene, possibly interacting with carcinogenic factors, such as an oncogenic virus, may be the cause. A cancer-control potential exists for tumor associations such as those exhibited in this kindred, as well as for other cancer genetic syndromes where careful consideration is given to all histologic varieties of cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1227-1229
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume110
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1975

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Nuclear Family
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Oncogenic Viruses
Rhabdomyosarcoma
Brain Neoplasms
Fathers
Leukemia
History
Mothers
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Breast Cancer Genetics and Cancer Control : Tumor Association. / Lynch, Henry T.; Lynch, Jane; Lynch, Pat.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 110, No. 10, 1975, p. 1227-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, Henry T. ; Lynch, Jane ; Lynch, Pat. / Breast Cancer Genetics and Cancer Control : Tumor Association. In: Archives of Surgery. 1975 ; Vol. 110, No. 10. pp. 1227-1229.
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