Business-to-business e-procurement

Success factors and challenges to implementation

Rebecca Angeles, Ravinder Nath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The paper seeks to pursue the understanding of current business-to-business e-procurement practices by describing the success factors and challenges to its implementation in the corporate setting. Design/methodology/approach - Members of the Institute for Supply Management and the Council of Logistics Management were asked to respond to a survey questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to analyze data from valid responses received from 185 firms. Findings - Factor analysis resulted in three e-procurement success factors (SF):supplier and contract management; end-user behavior and e-procurement business processes; and information and e-procurement infrastructure. Three challenge-to-implementation factors (CIF) also emerged: lack of system integration and standardization issues; immaturity of e-procurement-based market services and end-user resistance; and maverick buying and difficulty in integrating e-commerce with other systems. Research limitations/implications - A representative sampling design should be used in the future to be able to make claims for generalizable results. Practical implications - E-procurement is a very important initiative with significant cost savings potential for firms. This study's findings can guide various stages of corporate implementation efforts. Originality/value - This study fulfills the need for solid empirical findings on this very important topic that has a direct impact on a firm's bottom line. E-procurement is still in the early stages of marketplace deployment and guidance is still needed on how to do it right.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-115
Number of pages12
JournalSupply Chain Management
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Business to business
Success factors
E-procurement
End users
Factor analysis
Guidance
Business process
Electronic commerce
Supply management
Supplier management
Factors
Standardization
User behavior
Logistics management
System integration
Cost savings
Design methodology
Questionnaire survey
Contract management
Sampling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Business-to-business e-procurement : Success factors and challenges to implementation. / Angeles, Rebecca; Nath, Ravinder.

In: Supply Chain Management, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2007, p. 104-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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