Calcium absorptive efficiency is positively related to body size

M. Janet Barger-Lux, Robert P. Heaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Calcium absorption efficiency is a more important determinant of calcium balance than calcium intake itself. The sources of variability in absorptive performance are only partly elucidated. Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between body size and calcium absorption efficiency. Design and Setting: Metabolic studies were performed on an inpatient metabolic unit in an academic health sciences center. Subjects: One hundred seventy-eight women, with an average age of 50.2 yr, were studied from one to five times and yielded an aggregate data set containing 633 individual studies. Methods: Calcium absorption fraction was measured by the dual-tracer method. Observed values were expressed as residuals from predicted values for each woman's actual calcium intake, using the previously published relationship between intake and absorption. Results: Absorption residuals were significantly positively correlated with height, weight, and surface area, and after adjusting for estrogen status, these body size variables accounted for approximately 4% of the total variability. Conclusion: The magnitude of the effect is such that a woman 1.8 m in height would absorb 30+% more calcium from a given intake than a woman 1.4 m tall.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5118-5120
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume90
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Body Size
Calcium
Inpatients
Estrogens
Health
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Calcium absorptive efficiency is positively related to body size. / Barger-Lux, M. Janet; Heaney, Robert P.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 90, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 5118-5120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barger-Lux, M. Janet ; Heaney, Robert P. / Calcium absorptive efficiency is positively related to body size. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2005 ; Vol. 90, No. 9. pp. 5118-5120.
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