Calcium intake and body weight

K. M. Davies, R. P. Heaney, Robert R. Recker, Joan M. Lappe, M. J. Barger-Lux, K. Rafferty, S. Hinders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

353 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Five clinical studies of calcium intake, designed with a primary skeletal end point, were reevaluated to explore associations between calcium intake and body weight. All subjects were women, clustered in three main age groups: 3rd, 5th, and 8th decades. Total sample size was 780. Four of the studies were observational; two were cross-sectional, in which body mass index was regressed against entry level calcium intake; and two were longitudinal, in which change in weight over time was regressed against calcium intake. One study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of calcium supplementation, in which change in weight during the course of study was evaluated as a function of treatment status. Significant negative associations between calcium intake and weight were found for all three age groups, and the odds ratio for being overweight (body mass index, >26) was 2.25 for young women in the lower half of the calcium intakes of their respective study groups (P <0.02). Relative to placebo, the calcium-treated subjects in the controlled trial exhibited a significant weight loss across nearly 4 yr of observation. Estimates of the relationship indicate that a 1000-mg calcium intake difference is associated with an 8-kg difference in mean body weight and that calcium intake explains ∼3% of the variance in body weight.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4635-4638
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume85
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Body Weight
Calcium
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Age Groups
Placebos
Sample Size
Observational Studies
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Odds Ratio
Observation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Davies, K. M., Heaney, R. P., Recker, R. R., Lappe, J. M., Barger-Lux, M. J., Rafferty, K., & Hinders, S. (2000). Calcium intake and body weight. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 85(12), 4635-4638. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.85.12.4635

Calcium intake and body weight. / Davies, K. M.; Heaney, R. P.; Recker, Robert R.; Lappe, Joan M.; Barger-Lux, M. J.; Rafferty, K.; Hinders, S.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 85, No. 12, 2000, p. 4635-4638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, KM, Heaney, RP, Recker, RR, Lappe, JM, Barger-Lux, MJ, Rafferty, K & Hinders, S 2000, 'Calcium intake and body weight', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 85, no. 12, pp. 4635-4638. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.85.12.4635
Davies, K. M. ; Heaney, R. P. ; Recker, Robert R. ; Lappe, Joan M. ; Barger-Lux, M. J. ; Rafferty, K. ; Hinders, S. / Calcium intake and body weight. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2000 ; Vol. 85, No. 12. pp. 4635-4638.
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