Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium

M. Janet Barger-Lux, K. Michael Davies, Robert P. Heaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 ± 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 ± 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 ± 181 mg/d; 15.1 ± 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 ± 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7%. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10%/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by ∼15%. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2362-2366
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume135
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

bones
Diet
Calcium
calcium
Bone and Bones
diet
Bone Density
Dietary Calcium
lumbar spine
bone density
Tablets
hips
Spine
placebos
Placebos
Pelvic Bones
Diet Records
Dietary Proteins
Densitometry
Carbonates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium. / Barger-Lux, M. Janet; Davies, K. Michael; Heaney, Robert P.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 135, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 2362-2366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barger-Lux, M. Janet ; Davies, K. Michael ; Heaney, Robert P. / Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2005 ; Vol. 135, No. 10. pp. 2362-2366.
@article{783adcf69bbe45bf9ca2f1de1609394f,
title = "Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium",
abstract = "In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 ± 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 ± 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 ± 181 mg/d; 15.1 ± 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 ± 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7{\%}. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10{\%}/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by ∼15{\%}. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.",
author = "Barger-Lux, {M. Janet} and Davies, {K. Michael} and Heaney, {Robert P.}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "135",
pages = "2362--2366",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium

AU - Barger-Lux, M. Janet

AU - Davies, K. Michael

AU - Heaney, Robert P.

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 ± 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 ± 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 ± 181 mg/d; 15.1 ± 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 ± 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7%. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10%/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by ∼15%. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.

AB - In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 ± 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 ± 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 ± 181 mg/d; 15.1 ± 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 ± 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7%. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10%/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by ∼15%. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26444539518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=26444539518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 135

SP - 2362

EP - 2366

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 10

ER -