Cancer genetics, part III: genetic markers, childhood cancer problems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In spite of increasing interest in cancer genetics relatively little knowledge is available pertaining to genetic markers. This review briefly discussed several genetic markers including G 6 PD and cytogenetic findings such as Philadelphia chromosome (PH1) in chronic myelogenous leukemia. The study also discusses the role of genetics in childhood cancer including population investigations such as the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers. In addition, a family with histologically verified cancer in two siblings (sarcoma of the thigh in the proband and medulloblastoma of the right cerebellum in a 6 yr old sister), sarcoma in their father, cancer of the liver by history in the 2 yr old paternal aunt of the proband, and histologically verified cancer in both paternal grandparents are discussed. This family serves as an example of the type of problem which may present to the cancer geneticist wherein no currently recognizable hereditary cancer syndrome exists which might be consistent with these findings. Thus while the familial aggregation of cancer in this particular family appears to be significant, one must attempt to determine other factors such as cytogenetics, genetic markers, and viral studies which might help elucidate etiology. (Lynch - Omaha, Nebr.)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-433
Number of pages4
JournalThe Nebraska medical journal
Volume58
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1973

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Genetic Markers
Neoplasms
Cytogenetics
Sarcoma
Siblings
Hereditary Neoplastic Syndromes
Philadelphia Chromosome
Medulloblastoma
Liver Neoplasms
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Thigh
Fathers
Cerebellum
History
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cancer genetics, part III : genetic markers, childhood cancer problems. / Lynch, Henry T.

In: The Nebraska medical journal, Vol. 58, No. 12, 1973, p. 430-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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