Cancer in Southeast Asia

Strategies for Control

Alton I. Sutnick, Henry T. Lynch, Daniel G. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence and mortality from cancer has been increasing steadily in southeast Asia, probably related to increased life expectancy resulting from control of some of the major diseases. There are many impediments to cancer control in that part of the world, including poverty, limited access to health services, primarily rural distribution of population, and the dependence on treatment by traditional healers. There are potentially controllable environmental factors associated with some cancers commonly seen in countries of southeast Asia. We have proposed changes in the approach to cancer control in these countries. These include political organization, professional education programs, manpower development in special areas of need, public education in cancer prevention, early detection, team approaches to diagnosis and treatment, and emphasis on epidemiology in research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-497
Number of pages3
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume251
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 27 1984

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Southeastern Asia
Neoplasms
Professional Education
Rural Population
Poverty
Life Expectancy
Early Detection of Cancer
Health Services
Epidemiology
Organizations
Education
Mortality
Incidence
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cancer in Southeast Asia : Strategies for Control. / Sutnick, Alton I.; Lynch, Henry T.; Miller, Daniel G.

In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 251, No. 4, 27.01.1984, p. 495-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutnick, Alton I. ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Miller, Daniel G. / Cancer in Southeast Asia : Strategies for Control. In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. 1984 ; Vol. 251, No. 4. pp. 495-497.
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