Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis.

N. R. Rose, Kirk Beisel, A. Herskowitz, N. Neu, L. J. Wolfgram, F. L. Alvarez, M. D. Traystman, S. W. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Infection with type 3 of the group B Coxsackieviruses (CB3) sometimes leads to the development of myocarditis in humans. Circumstantial evidence in the form of heart-reactive antibodies in these cases of human myocarditis suggests that the later phases of the disease may be due to autoimmunization. Since human myocarditis is a relatively rare sequel to infection with CB3 virus, we propose that it reflects a genetic predisposition in some individuals. To investigate this possibility we established an experimental murine model of viral myocarditis. By testing a large number of strains of inbred mice infected with CB3 we found that a few strains developed an ongoing myocarditis characterized by diffuse interstitial mononuclear infiltration and by the production of heart-specific IgG autoantibodies. These antibodies reacted with myocardial sarcolemma and myofibrils as well as with muscle striations. The principal myocardial autoantigen, identified by means of postinfectious sera of mice with heart-specific autoantibodies, was found to be the cardiac isoform of myosin. Immunization of susceptible mice with cardiac myosin stimulated the production of heart-specific antibodies reactive with both cardiac muscle striations and sarcolemma, accompanied by mononuclear infiltration of the myocardium. From these results we infer that cardiac myosin is an autoantigen capable of inducing postinfectious myocarditis in genetically predisposed individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-24
Number of pages22
JournalCiba Foundation symposium
Volume129
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiac Myosins
Myocarditis
Sarcolemma
Autoantigens
Autoantibodies
Antibodies
Myocardium
Human Enterovirus B
Inbred Strains Mice
Myofibrils
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Infection
Immunization
Protein Isoforms
Theoretical Models
Immunoglobulin G
Viruses
Muscles
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rose, N. R., Beisel, K., Herskowitz, A., Neu, N., Wolfgram, L. J., Alvarez, F. L., ... Craig, S. W. (1987). Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis. Ciba Foundation symposium, 129, 3-24.

Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis. / Rose, N. R.; Beisel, Kirk; Herskowitz, A.; Neu, N.; Wolfgram, L. J.; Alvarez, F. L.; Traystman, M. D.; Craig, S. W.

In: Ciba Foundation symposium, Vol. 129, 1987, p. 3-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, NR, Beisel, K, Herskowitz, A, Neu, N, Wolfgram, LJ, Alvarez, FL, Traystman, MD & Craig, SW 1987, 'Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis.', Ciba Foundation symposium, vol. 129, pp. 3-24.
Rose NR, Beisel K, Herskowitz A, Neu N, Wolfgram LJ, Alvarez FL et al. Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis. Ciba Foundation symposium. 1987;129:3-24.
Rose, N. R. ; Beisel, Kirk ; Herskowitz, A. ; Neu, N. ; Wolfgram, L. J. ; Alvarez, F. L. ; Traystman, M. D. ; Craig, S. W. / Cardiac myosin and autoimmune myocarditis. In: Ciba Foundation symposium. 1987 ; Vol. 129. pp. 3-24.
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