Clinical impact of molecular genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, and management of hereditary cancer: Part I: Studies of cancer in families

Henry T. Lynch, Patrice Watson, Trudy G. Shaw, Jane F. Lynch, Anne E. Harty, Barbara A. Franklin, Christine R. Kapler, Susan T. Tinley, Bo Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hereditary cancer represents approximately 5-10% of the total cancer burden and may account for 60,000 to 120,000 new cancer occurrences this year in the United States. New developments in molecular genetics and the cloning of cancer-prone genes have intensely fueled interest in dealing with hereditary forms of cancer. The authors provide an algorithm that depicts the process for the identification, study, and DNA-based genetic counseling of families being investigated under a research proposal at the Hereditary Cancer Institute of Creighton University School of Medicine. They have studied 56 hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma families; in 18 of them, associated genomic mutations have been identified in affected members. DNA-based genetic counseling has been provided for seven of these families. The authors have also evaluated 131 hereditary breast-ovarian carcinoma families. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation searches have been performed for 76 of these families; BRCA1 mutations were found in 38 families and BRCA2 mutations in 9. The study of cancer-prone families is a powerful approach to cancer control, particularly when the germ-line mutation is identified in the family and individuals at high risk can be tested, once they provide informed consent, and receive DNA-based genetic counseling. Discovery of the germ-line mutation for cancer proneness provides an unparalleled opportunity to predict patients' life-time risk for cancer of specific anatomic sites, inclusive of a pattern of multiple primaries. Surveillance and management protocols, when melded to the particular syndrome's natural history, can be life-saving.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2449-2456
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume86
Issue number11 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

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Genetic Counseling
Molecular Biology
Neoplasms
Mutation
Germ-Line Mutation
DNA
Neoplasm Genes
Molecular Cloning
Natural History
Informed Consent
Colorectal Neoplasms
Research Design
Medicine
Breast Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lynch, H. T., Watson, P., Shaw, T. G., Lynch, J. F., Harty, A. E., Franklin, B. A., ... Liu, B. (1999). Clinical impact of molecular genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, and management of hereditary cancer: Part I: Studies of cancer in families. Cancer, 86(11 SUPPL.), 2449-2456.

Clinical impact of molecular genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, and management of hereditary cancer : Part I: Studies of cancer in families. / Lynch, Henry T.; Watson, Patrice; Shaw, Trudy G.; Lynch, Jane F.; Harty, Anne E.; Franklin, Barbara A.; Kapler, Christine R.; Tinley, Susan T.; Liu, Bo.

In: Cancer, Vol. 86, No. 11 SUPPL., 01.12.1999, p. 2449-2456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, HT, Watson, P, Shaw, TG, Lynch, JF, Harty, AE, Franklin, BA, Kapler, CR, Tinley, ST & Liu, B 1999, 'Clinical impact of molecular genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, and management of hereditary cancer: Part I: Studies of cancer in families', Cancer, vol. 86, no. 11 SUPPL., pp. 2449-2456.
Lynch, Henry T. ; Watson, Patrice ; Shaw, Trudy G. ; Lynch, Jane F. ; Harty, Anne E. ; Franklin, Barbara A. ; Kapler, Christine R. ; Tinley, Susan T. ; Liu, Bo. / Clinical impact of molecular genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, and management of hereditary cancer : Part I: Studies of cancer in families. In: Cancer. 1999 ; Vol. 86, No. 11 SUPPL. pp. 2449-2456.
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