Comparison of fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone in smoking cessation

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Abstract

The authors compared the outcome of 208 smokers treated with fixed-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 69), tapered-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 71), or buspirone (n = 68). At baseline, there were no significant differences among the three treatment groups with regard to age, gender, educational level, duration of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, concomitant disease states or drug use, or Fagerstrom score. All smokers participated in a behavior modification program. Fixed-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 6 weeks. Tapered-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 4 weeks, 14 mg/day for 4 weeks and 7 mg/day for 4 weeks. Both transdermal nicotine regimens were initiated on the evening before the attempted quit date. Buspirone was started 21 days before the quit attempt and continued for 7 days after the quit attempt. Buspirone was initiated at 5 mg TID for 7 days and then 10 mg TID for 21 days. Smoking cessation was assessed by patient diaries and random plasma thiocyanate determinations. Dropouts for any reason were considered treatment failures. Quit rates were as shown in the Table I. Discontinuation of treatment for perceived side effects and dropouts for all reasons were not significantly different among the treatment groups. The authors conclude that fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone are associated with similar efficacy and safety when combined with behavior modification in smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222-224
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume34
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1994

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Buspirone
Smoking Cessation
Nicotine
Behavior Therapy
Treatment Failure
Therapeutics
Smoking
Safety
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone in smoking cessation",
abstract = "The authors compared the outcome of 208 smokers treated with fixed-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 69), tapered-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 71), or buspirone (n = 68). At baseline, there were no significant differences among the three treatment groups with regard to age, gender, educational level, duration of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, concomitant disease states or drug use, or Fagerstrom score. All smokers participated in a behavior modification program. Fixed-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 6 weeks. Tapered-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 4 weeks, 14 mg/day for 4 weeks and 7 mg/day for 4 weeks. Both transdermal nicotine regimens were initiated on the evening before the attempted quit date. Buspirone was started 21 days before the quit attempt and continued for 7 days after the quit attempt. Buspirone was initiated at 5 mg TID for 7 days and then 10 mg TID for 21 days. Smoking cessation was assessed by patient diaries and random plasma thiocyanate determinations. Dropouts for any reason were considered treatment failures. Quit rates were as shown in the Table I. Discontinuation of treatment for perceived side effects and dropouts for all reasons were not significantly different among the treatment groups. The authors conclude that fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone are associated with similar efficacy and safety when combined with behavior modification in smoking cessation.",
author = "Hilleman, {Daniel E.} and Mohiuddin, {Syed M.} and {Del Core}, Michael",
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N2 - The authors compared the outcome of 208 smokers treated with fixed-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 69), tapered-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 71), or buspirone (n = 68). At baseline, there were no significant differences among the three treatment groups with regard to age, gender, educational level, duration of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, concomitant disease states or drug use, or Fagerstrom score. All smokers participated in a behavior modification program. Fixed-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 6 weeks. Tapered-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 4 weeks, 14 mg/day for 4 weeks and 7 mg/day for 4 weeks. Both transdermal nicotine regimens were initiated on the evening before the attempted quit date. Buspirone was started 21 days before the quit attempt and continued for 7 days after the quit attempt. Buspirone was initiated at 5 mg TID for 7 days and then 10 mg TID for 21 days. Smoking cessation was assessed by patient diaries and random plasma thiocyanate determinations. Dropouts for any reason were considered treatment failures. Quit rates were as shown in the Table I. Discontinuation of treatment for perceived side effects and dropouts for all reasons were not significantly different among the treatment groups. The authors conclude that fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone are associated with similar efficacy and safety when combined with behavior modification in smoking cessation.

AB - The authors compared the outcome of 208 smokers treated with fixed-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 69), tapered-dose transdermal nicotine (n = 71), or buspirone (n = 68). At baseline, there were no significant differences among the three treatment groups with regard to age, gender, educational level, duration of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, concomitant disease states or drug use, or Fagerstrom score. All smokers participated in a behavior modification program. Fixed-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 6 weeks. Tapered-dose transdermal nicotine was given at a dose of 21 or 22 mg/day for 4 weeks, 14 mg/day for 4 weeks and 7 mg/day for 4 weeks. Both transdermal nicotine regimens were initiated on the evening before the attempted quit date. Buspirone was started 21 days before the quit attempt and continued for 7 days after the quit attempt. Buspirone was initiated at 5 mg TID for 7 days and then 10 mg TID for 21 days. Smoking cessation was assessed by patient diaries and random plasma thiocyanate determinations. Dropouts for any reason were considered treatment failures. Quit rates were as shown in the Table I. Discontinuation of treatment for perceived side effects and dropouts for all reasons were not significantly different among the treatment groups. The authors conclude that fixed-dose transdermal nicotine, tapered-dose transdermal nicotine, and buspirone are associated with similar efficacy and safety when combined with behavior modification in smoking cessation.

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