Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice: Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes

Steven Tracy, Kristen M. Drescher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human enteroviruses (HEVs) like the group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are prime candidates for infectious, environmental causes of human type 1 diabetes (T1D). Non-obese diabetic (NOD) female mice are well protected from T1D onset if inoculated with CVB when young. Older, prediabetic NOD mice can rapidly develop T1D following inoculation with CVB, mimicking clinical reports of disease-associated T1D onset. The ability to induce rapid T1D in NOD mice is linked to the rate of replication of the CVB strain in β cell cultures and pancreatic tissue, indicating that any CVB strain is potentially diabetogenic under the correct conditions. Rapid T1D onset is preceded by CVB replication in islet cells including β cells. Although CVB strains do not productively infect healthy islets of young mice, CVBs can replicate in healthy islets in the presence of murine IL-4. These models expand much of what is known or suspected regarding the etiologic role of HEVs in human T1D.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHow Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis
Pages143-151
Number of pages9
Volume1103
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1103
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Coxsackievirus Infections
Inbred NOD Mouse
Medical problems
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Enterovirus
Human Enterovirus B
Islets of Langerhans
Cell culture
Interleukin-4
Cell Culture Techniques
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Tracy, S., & Drescher, K. M. (2007). Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice: Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes. In How Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis (Vol. 1103, pp. 143-151). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1103). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1394.009

Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice : Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes. / Tracy, Steven; Drescher, Kristen M.

How Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis. Vol. 1103 2007. p. 143-151 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1103).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tracy, S & Drescher, KM 2007, Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice: Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes. in How Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis. vol. 1103, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1103, pp. 143-151. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1394.009
Tracy S, Drescher KM. Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice: Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes. In How Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis. Vol. 1103. 2007. p. 143-151. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1394.009
Tracy, Steven ; Drescher, Kristen M. / Coxsackievirus infections and NOD mice : Relevant models of protection from, and induction of, type 1 diabetes. How Do We Best Employ Animal Models for Type 1 Diabetesand Multiple Sclerosis. Vol. 1103 2007. pp. 143-151 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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