Creation of medicinal chemistry learning communities through enhanced technology and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Brian Henriksen, Victoria Roche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To build an integrated medicinal chemistry learning community of campus and distance pharmacy students though the use of innovative technology and interdisciplinary teaching.Design. Mechanisms were implemented to bring distance students into campus-based medicinal chemistry classrooms in real time, stimulate interaction between instructors and various student cohorts, and promote group work during class. Also, pharmacy clinician colleagues were recruited to contribute to the teaching of the 3 medicinal chemistry courses.Assessment. Student perceptions on the value of technology to build community and advance learning were gleaned from course evaluations, in class feedback, and conversations with class officers and student groups. Responses on a survey of second-year students confirmed the benefits of interdisciplinary content integration on engagement and awareness of the connection between drug chemistry and pharmacy practice. A survey of clinician colleagues who contributed to teaching the 3 medicinal chemistry courses found their views were similar to those of students.Conclusions. The purposeful use of technology united learners, fostered communication, and advanced content comprehension in 3 medicinal chemistry courses taught to campus and distance students. Teaching collaboration with pharmacy clinicians enhanced learner interest in course content and provided insight into the integrated nature of the profession of pharmacy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume76
Issue number8
StatePublished - Oct 12 2012

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Chemistry
chemistry
Learning
Students
Technology
Teaching
learning
community
student
Pharmacy Students
group work
Communication
instructor
comprehension
conversation
profession
drug
classroom
communication
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Education

Cite this

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