Cross-sectional study examining shoulder pain and disability in division I female swimmers

Shana Harrington, Corinne Meisel, Angela Tate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The prevalence of shoulder pain in the competitive swimming population has been reported to be as high as 91%. Female collegiate swimmers have a reported shoulder-injury rate 3 times greater than their male counterparts. There has been little information on how to best prevent shoulder pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if differences exist in shoulder range of motion, upper-extremity strength, core endurance, and pectoralis minor length in NCAA Division I female swimmers with and without shoulder pain and disability. Methods: NCAA Division I females (N = 37) currently swimming completed a brief survey that included the pain subscale of the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) and the sports/performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure. Passive range of motion for shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) at 90° abduction was measured using a digital inclinometer. Strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer for scapular depression and adduction, scapular adduction, IR, and ER. Core endurance was assessed using the side-bridge and prone-bridge tests. Pectoralis minor muscle length was assessed in both a resting and a stretched position using the PALM palpation meter. All measures were taken on the dominant and nondominant arms. Results: Participants were classified as positive for pain and disability if the following 2 criteria were met: The DASH sports module score was >6/20 points and the PSS strenuous pain score was ≥4/10. If these criteria were not met, participants were classified as negative for pain and disability. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the dominant side for pectoralis muscle length at rest (P =.003) and stretch (P =.029). Conclusions: The results provide preliminary evidence regarding an association between a decrease in pectoralis minor length and shoulder pain and disability in Division I female swimmers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-75
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Shoulder Pain
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pectoralis Muscles
Pain
Arm
Articular Range of Motion
Sports
Hand
Palpation
Art
Upper Extremity
Population
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Cross-sectional study examining shoulder pain and disability in division I female swimmers. / Harrington, Shana; Meisel, Corinne; Tate, Angela.

In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. 23, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 65-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harrington, Shana ; Meisel, Corinne ; Tate, Angela. / Cross-sectional study examining shoulder pain and disability in division I female swimmers. In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 65-75.
@article{e804a414981f427b84ebbb41fa8d443f,
title = "Cross-sectional study examining shoulder pain and disability in division I female swimmers",
abstract = "Context: The prevalence of shoulder pain in the competitive swimming population has been reported to be as high as 91{\%}. Female collegiate swimmers have a reported shoulder-injury rate 3 times greater than their male counterparts. There has been little information on how to best prevent shoulder pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if differences exist in shoulder range of motion, upper-extremity strength, core endurance, and pectoralis minor length in NCAA Division I female swimmers with and without shoulder pain and disability. Methods: NCAA Division I females (N = 37) currently swimming completed a brief survey that included the pain subscale of the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) and the sports/performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure. Passive range of motion for shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) at 90° abduction was measured using a digital inclinometer. Strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer for scapular depression and adduction, scapular adduction, IR, and ER. Core endurance was assessed using the side-bridge and prone-bridge tests. Pectoralis minor muscle length was assessed in both a resting and a stretched position using the PALM palpation meter. All measures were taken on the dominant and nondominant arms. Results: Participants were classified as positive for pain and disability if the following 2 criteria were met: The DASH sports module score was >6/20 points and the PSS strenuous pain score was ≥4/10. If these criteria were not met, participants were classified as negative for pain and disability. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the dominant side for pectoralis muscle length at rest (P =.003) and stretch (P =.029). Conclusions: The results provide preliminary evidence regarding an association between a decrease in pectoralis minor length and shoulder pain and disability in Division I female swimmers.",
author = "Shana Harrington and Corinne Meisel and Angela Tate",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1123/JSR.2012-0123",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "65--75",
journal = "Journal of Sport Rehabilitation",
issn = "1056-6716",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-sectional study examining shoulder pain and disability in division I female swimmers

AU - Harrington, Shana

AU - Meisel, Corinne

AU - Tate, Angela

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Context: The prevalence of shoulder pain in the competitive swimming population has been reported to be as high as 91%. Female collegiate swimmers have a reported shoulder-injury rate 3 times greater than their male counterparts. There has been little information on how to best prevent shoulder pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if differences exist in shoulder range of motion, upper-extremity strength, core endurance, and pectoralis minor length in NCAA Division I female swimmers with and without shoulder pain and disability. Methods: NCAA Division I females (N = 37) currently swimming completed a brief survey that included the pain subscale of the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) and the sports/performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure. Passive range of motion for shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) at 90° abduction was measured using a digital inclinometer. Strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer for scapular depression and adduction, scapular adduction, IR, and ER. Core endurance was assessed using the side-bridge and prone-bridge tests. Pectoralis minor muscle length was assessed in both a resting and a stretched position using the PALM palpation meter. All measures were taken on the dominant and nondominant arms. Results: Participants were classified as positive for pain and disability if the following 2 criteria were met: The DASH sports module score was >6/20 points and the PSS strenuous pain score was ≥4/10. If these criteria were not met, participants were classified as negative for pain and disability. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the dominant side for pectoralis muscle length at rest (P =.003) and stretch (P =.029). Conclusions: The results provide preliminary evidence regarding an association between a decrease in pectoralis minor length and shoulder pain and disability in Division I female swimmers.

AB - Context: The prevalence of shoulder pain in the competitive swimming population has been reported to be as high as 91%. Female collegiate swimmers have a reported shoulder-injury rate 3 times greater than their male counterparts. There has been little information on how to best prevent shoulder pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if differences exist in shoulder range of motion, upper-extremity strength, core endurance, and pectoralis minor length in NCAA Division I female swimmers with and without shoulder pain and disability. Methods: NCAA Division I females (N = 37) currently swimming completed a brief survey that included the pain subscale of the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) and the sports/performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure. Passive range of motion for shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) at 90° abduction was measured using a digital inclinometer. Strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer for scapular depression and adduction, scapular adduction, IR, and ER. Core endurance was assessed using the side-bridge and prone-bridge tests. Pectoralis minor muscle length was assessed in both a resting and a stretched position using the PALM palpation meter. All measures were taken on the dominant and nondominant arms. Results: Participants were classified as positive for pain and disability if the following 2 criteria were met: The DASH sports module score was >6/20 points and the PSS strenuous pain score was ≥4/10. If these criteria were not met, participants were classified as negative for pain and disability. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the dominant side for pectoralis muscle length at rest (P =.003) and stretch (P =.029). Conclusions: The results provide preliminary evidence regarding an association between a decrease in pectoralis minor length and shoulder pain and disability in Division I female swimmers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893399651&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893399651&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/JSR.2012-0123

DO - 10.1123/JSR.2012-0123

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 65

EP - 75

JO - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

SN - 1056-6716

IS - 1

ER -