Crystallization and solid-state polymerization of poly(bisphenol A carbonate) facilitated by supercritical CO2

Stephen Gross, George W. Roberts, Douglas J. Kiserow, Joseph M. Desimone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poly(bisphenol A carbonate) was synthesized by solid-state polymerization (SSP) using supercritical CO2 to induce crystallinity in low molecular weight polycarbonate beads. The CO2-induced crystallization was studied as a function of time, temperature, molecular weight, and pressure. There was an optimum temperature for crystallization which depended on the molecular weight of the polymer. The molecular weight and percent crystallinity of the polymer produced by SSP were determined as a function of time and radial position in the bead. The molecular weight and percent crystallinity were strong functions of the particle radius, probably because of the slow diffusion of phenol out of the polymer particles. Nitrogen and supercritical CO2 were used as sweep fluids for the SSP process. The polymerization rate was always higher in supercritical CO2 at otherwise comparable conditions. We hypothesize that supercritical CO2 plasticizes the amorphous regions of the polymer, thereby increasing chain mobility and the rate of phenol diffusion out of the polymer. This permits the reaction temperature to be reduced, thereby suppressing side reactions that lead to color body formation. These advantages result in higher molecular weight product with good optical clarity when supercritical CO2 is the sweep fluid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-45
Number of pages6
JournalMacromolecules
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 11 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbonates
Crystallization
Molecular weight
Polymerization
Polymers
polycarbonate
Phenol
Phenols
Fluids
Polycarbonates
Temperature
bisphenol A
Nitrogen
Color

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Crystallization and solid-state polymerization of poly(bisphenol A carbonate) facilitated by supercritical CO2 . / Gross, Stephen; Roberts, George W.; Kiserow, Douglas J.; Desimone, Joseph M.

In: Macromolecules, Vol. 33, No. 1, 11.01.2000, p. 40-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gross, Stephen ; Roberts, George W. ; Kiserow, Douglas J. ; Desimone, Joseph M. / Crystallization and solid-state polymerization of poly(bisphenol A carbonate) facilitated by supercritical CO2 . In: Macromolecules. 2000 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 40-45.
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