Current hypotheses on how microsatellite instability leads to enhanced survival of lynch syndrome patients

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Abstract

High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high) are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Article number170432
JournalClinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume2010
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Neoplasms
Microsatellite Instability
Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival
Microsatellite Repeats
Neoplasm Metastasis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Current hypotheses on how microsatellite instability leads to enhanced survival of lynch syndrome patients",
abstract = "High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high) are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.",
author = "Drescher, {Kristen M.} and Sharma, {Poonam K} and Lynch, {Henry T.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1155/2010/170432",
language = "English",
volume = "2010",
journal = "Journal of Immunology Research",
issn = "2314-8861",
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AU - Drescher, Kristen M.

AU - Sharma, Poonam K

AU - Lynch, Henry T.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high) are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

AB - High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high) are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

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DO - 10.1155/2010/170432

M3 - Review article

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JO - Journal of Immunology Research

JF - Journal of Immunology Research

SN - 2314-8861

M1 - 170432

ER -