David Barrows and perceptions of historical consciousness in the colonial Philippines

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

This article explores American efforts in the colonial Philippines to instil a consciousness of history and modernity among Filipinos through a carefully crafted philosophy of time. It focuses primarily on David Barrow's work, History of the Philippine Islands (1905), as the ideal embodiment of a broad discourse permeating notions of superiority and inferiority, historicity and ahistoricity, and civilizational development - notions which shaped colonialism in the Philippines. This article argues that Americans were able to develop a sense of fundamental temporal difference with their colonial subjects - a fundamental difference that could be effectively employed and articulated to overcome shortcomings or inconsistencies in other discourses of colonial power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-167
Number of pages15
JournalSojourn
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

historical consciousness
Philippines
colonial power
discourse
history
colonial age
consciousness
modernity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

David Barrows and perceptions of historical consciousness in the colonial Philippines. / Hawkins, Michael C.

In: Sojourn, Vol. 27, No. 1, 04.2012, p. 153-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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