Disrupted visceral feedback reduces locomotor activity and influences background contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice

K. Janitzky, R. Linke, D. M. Yilmazer-Hanke, G. Grecksch, H. Schwegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present experiments were designed to study fear conditioning as an emotional learning task with disrupted visceral feedback. For that purpose we used the peripherally acting β1-adrenoceptor blocker atenolol and studied its effects on the behavior of male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice in an exploration-related test and during fear-conditioning. In the first experiment, we treated mice with saline or different doses of the β1-adrenergic blocker atenolol (5 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg body weight i.p.) 30 min before behavioral testing in a motility box. Only the high but not the low dose of atenolol led to a reduction of locomotor activity (p <0.02). Factors known to be related to emotionality (rearing, area preference) were unaffected. In a second experiment, saline- and atenolol-treated mice (same dosages and mode of application) were trained for auditory fear conditioning, and 24 h later they were retested in the same environment. We found differences between the effects of atenolol upon contextual- and cue-fear conditioning. Animals treated with 20 mg/kg BW doses of atenolol showed significantly decreased background contextual fear compared to saline-treated control animals. In contrast, no differences were found during CS presentation in the conditioning context between atenolol-treated animals and saline-treated controls, independent from a paired or an unpaired conditioning paradigm. Thus, the blockade of peripheral β1-adrenoceptors by atenolol may have disrupted the positive feedback to the central nervous system via visceral afferents resulting in a decreased locomotor activity and background contextual fear.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume182
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Atenolol
Locomotion
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Fear
Adrenergic Receptors
Visceral Afferents
Adrenergic Antagonists
Conditioning (Psychology)
Cues
Central Nervous System
Body Weight
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Disrupted visceral feedback reduces locomotor activity and influences background contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. / Janitzky, K.; Linke, R.; Yilmazer-Hanke, D. M.; Grecksch, G.; Schwegler, H.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 182, No. 1, 22.08.2007, p. 109-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Janitzky, K. ; Linke, R. ; Yilmazer-Hanke, D. M. ; Grecksch, G. ; Schwegler, H. / Disrupted visceral feedback reduces locomotor activity and influences background contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2007 ; Vol. 182, No. 1. pp. 109-118.
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