DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity

Marcia A. Chan, Christina E. Ciaccio, Nicole M. Gigliotti, Mo Rezaiekhaligh, Jacob A. Siedlik, Kevin Kennedy, Charles S. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to its incidence and severity. A disproportionate number of children with asthma are economically disadvantaged and live in substandard housing with potential indoor environmental exposures such as cockroaches, dust mites, rodents and molds. These exposures may manifest through epigenetic mechanisms that can lead to changes in relevant gene expression. We examined the association of global DNA methylation levels with socioeconomic status, asthma severity and race/ethnicity. Methods: We measured global DNA methylation in peripheral blood of children with asthma enrolled in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program. Inclusion criteria included residing in the same home for a minimum of 4 days per week and total family income of less than 80% of the Kansas City median family income. DNA methylation levels were quantified by an immunoassay that assessed the percentage of 5-methylcytosine. Results: Our results indicate that overall, African American children had higher levels of global DNA methylation than children of other races/ethnicities (p = 0.029). This difference was more pronounced when socioeconomic status and asthma severity were coupled with race/ethnicity (p = 0.042) where low-income, African American children with persistent asthma had significantly elevated methylation levels relative to other races/ethnicities in the same context (p = 0.006, Hedges g = 1.14). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates a significant interaction effect among global DNA methylation levels, asthma severity, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-832
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2017

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DNA Methylation
Asthma
Social Class
African Americans
5-Methylcytosine
Cockroaches
Mites
Environmental Exposure
Vulnerable Populations
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Dust
Immunoassay
Epigenomics
Methylation
Rodentia
Chronic Disease
Fungi
Gene Expression
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Chan, M. A., Ciaccio, C. E., Gigliotti, N. M., Rezaiekhaligh, M., Siedlik, J. A., Kennedy, K., & Barnes, C. S. (2017). DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity. Journal of Asthma, 54(8), 825-832. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2016.1265126

DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity. / Chan, Marcia A.; Ciaccio, Christina E.; Gigliotti, Nicole M.; Rezaiekhaligh, Mo; Siedlik, Jacob A.; Kennedy, Kevin; Barnes, Charles S.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 54, No. 8, 14.09.2017, p. 825-832.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chan, MA, Ciaccio, CE, Gigliotti, NM, Rezaiekhaligh, M, Siedlik, JA, Kennedy, K & Barnes, CS 2017, 'DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity', Journal of Asthma, vol. 54, no. 8, pp. 825-832. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2016.1265126
Chan MA, Ciaccio CE, Gigliotti NM, Rezaiekhaligh M, Siedlik JA, Kennedy K et al. DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity. Journal of Asthma. 2017 Sep 14;54(8):825-832. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2016.1265126
Chan, Marcia A. ; Ciaccio, Christina E. ; Gigliotti, Nicole M. ; Rezaiekhaligh, Mo ; Siedlik, Jacob A. ; Kennedy, Kevin ; Barnes, Charles S. / DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity. In: Journal of Asthma. 2017 ; Vol. 54, No. 8. pp. 825-832.
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