Effect of a barley breakfast cereal on blood glucose and insulin response in normal and diabetic patients

M. Rendell, J. Vanderhoof, M. Venn, M. A. Shehan, E. Arndt, C. S. Rao, G. Gill, R. K. Newman, C. W. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Prowashonupana (Prowash) is a shrunken-endosperm, short awn, waxy starch, hulless barley with low starch, high fiber, high protein, and a relatively high concentration of free sugars. The study was designed to compare equivalent breakfast meals (w/w) of Prowash and oatmeal for glycemic response in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. A commercial liquid meal replacer (LMR) was included as a reference standard. A substantial reduction of the post-prandial glycemic peak following ingestion of Prowash was observed as compared to LMR or oatmeal. In the non-diabetic subjects, the maximal rise in glucose from baseline was 26.3± 3.9 mg/dL after LMR, 41.3± 3.9 mg/dL after oatmeal and 6.4± 2.7 mg/dL after Prowash (p <0.01). The maximal increase in glucose in the diabetic patients was 69.9± 4.5 mg/dL after LMR, 80.8± 8.8,mg/dL after oatmeal and 28.4± 3.5 mg/dL after Prowash (p <0.01). The maximal increase in insulin post-LMR was 33.9± 3.6 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients and 54.0± 9.8,mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls. Oatmeal elicited a maximal insulin increase of 29.9± 4.2, mIU/ml in the control subjects and 21.4± 2.5 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients. In contrast, the maximal insulin increase after Prowash was 8.6± 1.5 mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls and 6.8± 1.2 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients (p <0.01).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-67
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Foods for Human Nutrition
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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breakfast cereals
Breakfast
oatmeal
Hordeum
meals (menu)
blood glucose
Meals
Blood Glucose
insulin
barley
Insulin
Liquids
liquids
Starch
Glucose
barley starch
glucose
Sugars
breakfast
reference standards

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Plant Science
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Rendell, M., Vanderhoof, J., Venn, M., Shehan, M. A., Arndt, E., Rao, C. S., ... Newman, C. W. (2005). Effect of a barley breakfast cereal on blood glucose and insulin response in normal and diabetic patients. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 60(2), 63-67. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11130-005-5101-8

Effect of a barley breakfast cereal on blood glucose and insulin response in normal and diabetic patients. / Rendell, M.; Vanderhoof, J.; Venn, M.; Shehan, M. A.; Arndt, E.; Rao, C. S.; Gill, G.; Newman, R. K.; Newman, C. W.

In: Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, Vol. 60, No. 2, 06.2005, p. 63-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rendell, M, Vanderhoof, J, Venn, M, Shehan, MA, Arndt, E, Rao, CS, Gill, G, Newman, RK & Newman, CW 2005, 'Effect of a barley breakfast cereal on blood glucose and insulin response in normal and diabetic patients', Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, vol. 60, no. 2, pp. 63-67. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11130-005-5101-8
Rendell, M. ; Vanderhoof, J. ; Venn, M. ; Shehan, M. A. ; Arndt, E. ; Rao, C. S. ; Gill, G. ; Newman, R. K. ; Newman, C. W. / Effect of a barley breakfast cereal on blood glucose and insulin response in normal and diabetic patients. In: Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 2005 ; Vol. 60, No. 2. pp. 63-67.
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abstract = "Prowashonupana (Prowash) is a shrunken-endosperm, short awn, waxy starch, hulless barley with low starch, high fiber, high protein, and a relatively high concentration of free sugars. The study was designed to compare equivalent breakfast meals (w/w) of Prowash and oatmeal for glycemic response in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. A commercial liquid meal replacer (LMR) was included as a reference standard. A substantial reduction of the post-prandial glycemic peak following ingestion of Prowash was observed as compared to LMR or oatmeal. In the non-diabetic subjects, the maximal rise in glucose from baseline was 26.3± 3.9 mg/dL after LMR, 41.3± 3.9 mg/dL after oatmeal and 6.4± 2.7 mg/dL after Prowash (p <0.01). The maximal increase in glucose in the diabetic patients was 69.9± 4.5 mg/dL after LMR, 80.8± 8.8,mg/dL after oatmeal and 28.4± 3.5 mg/dL after Prowash (p <0.01). The maximal increase in insulin post-LMR was 33.9± 3.6 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients and 54.0± 9.8,mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls. Oatmeal elicited a maximal insulin increase of 29.9± 4.2, mIU/ml in the control subjects and 21.4± 2.5 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients. In contrast, the maximal insulin increase after Prowash was 8.6± 1.5 mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls and 6.8± 1.2 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients (p <0.01).",
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AU - Arndt, E.

AU - Rao, C. S.

AU - Gill, G.

AU - Newman, R. K.

AU - Newman, C. W.

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