Effect of early menopause on bone mineral density and fractures

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To review the data on the effect of early menopause on bone. Do women undergoing early menopause develop lower bone mineral density at an earlier age and do they have a higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures? Is there a difference on bone between women who undergo early natural menopause compared to women who have early menopause after oophorectomy? RESULTS: The earlier in life that menopause occurs, the lower the bone density will be later in life. Low bone density is associated with a higher fracture rate, and several studies show a relationship between early menopause, oophorectomy, and an increase in osteoporotic fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Early menopause is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Women with an early menopause should have bone density testing performed within 10 years of menopause so that osteopenia or osteoporosis will be diagnosed early and appropriate antiresorptive therapy initiated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-571
Number of pages5
JournalMenopause
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Bone Fractures
Menopause
Bone Density
Osteoporotic Fractures
Ovariectomy
Osteoporosis
Bone and Bones
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Effect of early menopause on bone mineral density and fractures. / Gallagher, John Christopher G.

In: Menopause, Vol. 14, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 567-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{5c6f7bab38cd49ce844a7a5834552a51,
title = "Effect of early menopause on bone mineral density and fractures",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To review the data on the effect of early menopause on bone. Do women undergoing early menopause develop lower bone mineral density at an earlier age and do they have a higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures? Is there a difference on bone between women who undergo early natural menopause compared to women who have early menopause after oophorectomy? RESULTS: The earlier in life that menopause occurs, the lower the bone density will be later in life. Low bone density is associated with a higher fracture rate, and several studies show a relationship between early menopause, oophorectomy, and an increase in osteoporotic fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Early menopause is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Women with an early menopause should have bone density testing performed within 10 years of menopause so that osteopenia or osteoporosis will be diagnosed early and appropriate antiresorptive therapy initiated.",
author = "Gallagher, {John Christopher G.}",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1097/gme.0b013e31804c793d",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "567--571",
journal = "Menopause",
issn = "1072-3714",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of early menopause on bone mineral density and fractures

AU - Gallagher, John Christopher G.

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review the data on the effect of early menopause on bone. Do women undergoing early menopause develop lower bone mineral density at an earlier age and do they have a higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures? Is there a difference on bone between women who undergo early natural menopause compared to women who have early menopause after oophorectomy? RESULTS: The earlier in life that menopause occurs, the lower the bone density will be later in life. Low bone density is associated with a higher fracture rate, and several studies show a relationship between early menopause, oophorectomy, and an increase in osteoporotic fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Early menopause is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Women with an early menopause should have bone density testing performed within 10 years of menopause so that osteopenia or osteoporosis will be diagnosed early and appropriate antiresorptive therapy initiated.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To review the data on the effect of early menopause on bone. Do women undergoing early menopause develop lower bone mineral density at an earlier age and do they have a higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures? Is there a difference on bone between women who undergo early natural menopause compared to women who have early menopause after oophorectomy? RESULTS: The earlier in life that menopause occurs, the lower the bone density will be later in life. Low bone density is associated with a higher fracture rate, and several studies show a relationship between early menopause, oophorectomy, and an increase in osteoporotic fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Early menopause is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Women with an early menopause should have bone density testing performed within 10 years of menopause so that osteopenia or osteoporosis will be diagnosed early and appropriate antiresorptive therapy initiated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248149937&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248149937&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/gme.0b013e31804c793d

DO - 10.1097/gme.0b013e31804c793d

M3 - Review article

VL - 14

SP - 567

EP - 571

JO - Menopause

JF - Menopause

SN - 1072-3714

IS - 3

ER -