Effectiveness of interventions designed to modify the activity demands of the occupations of self-care and leisure for people with alzheimer's disease and related dementias

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of modification of activity demands in the care of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Literature Review Project. The review included 10 articles addressing occupations of selfcare and leisure. No reports related to work and social participation were located. Results suggest that evidence for this intervention's effectiveness is strong. Four practice principles were derived from this appraisal: (1) Occupational therapy programs should be individualized to elicit the person's highest level of retained skill and interest, (2) cues used while assisting people with AD to complete tasks should be short and provide clear direction, (3) compensatory strategies in the form of environmental modifications and simple adaptive equipment should be specifically implemented on the basis of the unique needs of the person, and (4) caregiver training and involvement are essential in implementing individualized programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-531
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Occupational Therapy
Leisure Activities
Self Care
Occupations
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Social Participation
Caregivers
Cues
Equipment and Supplies
Direction compound
Practice (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Occupational Therapy

Cite this

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title = "Effectiveness of interventions designed to modify the activity demands of the occupations of self-care and leisure for people with alzheimer's disease and related dementias",
abstract = "A systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of modification of activity demands in the care of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Literature Review Project. The review included 10 articles addressing occupations of selfcare and leisure. No reports related to work and social participation were located. Results suggest that evidence for this intervention's effectiveness is strong. Four practice principles were derived from this appraisal: (1) Occupational therapy programs should be individualized to elicit the person's highest level of retained skill and interest, (2) cues used while assisting people with AD to complete tasks should be short and provide clear direction, (3) compensatory strategies in the form of environmental modifications and simple adaptive equipment should be specifically implemented on the basis of the unique needs of the person, and (4) caregiver training and involvement are essential in implementing individualized programs.",
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