Effects of peripheral CCK receptor blockade on feeding responses to duodenal nutrient infusions in rats

Roger D. Reidelberger, Dean Heimann, Linda Kelsey, Martin Hulce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Type A cholecystokinin receptor (CCKAR) antagonists differing in blood-brain barrier permeability were used to test the hypothesis that duodenal delivery of protein, carbohydrate, and fat produces satiety in part by an essential CCK action at CCKARs located peripheral to the blood-brain barrier. Fasted rats with open gastric fistulas received devazepide (1 mg/kg iv) or A-70104 (700 nmol·kg-1·h-1 iv) and either a 30-min intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (10 nmol·kg-1·h-1) or duodenal infusion of peptone, maltose, or Intralipid beginning 10 min before 30-min access to 15% sucrose. Devazepide penetrates the blood-brain barrier; A-70104, the dicyclohexylammonium salt of Nα-3-quinolinoyl-D-Glu-N,N-dipentylamide, does not. CCK-8 inhibited sham feeding by ∼50%, and both A-70104 and devazepide abolished this response. Duodenal infusion of each of the macronutrients dose dependently inhibited sham feeding. A-70104 and devazepide attenuated inhibitory responses to each macronutrient. Thus endogenous CCK appears to act in part at CCKARs peripheral to the blood-brain barrier to inhibit food intake.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume284
Issue number2 53-2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

Fingerprint

A 65186
Devazepide
Cholecystokinin Receptors
Blood-Brain Barrier
Food
Sincalide
Cholecystokinin A Receptor
Gastric Fistula
Peptones
Maltose
Intravenous Infusions
Sucrose
Permeability
Salts
Eating
Fats
Carbohydrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

Cite this

Effects of peripheral CCK receptor blockade on feeding responses to duodenal nutrient infusions in rats. / Reidelberger, Roger D.; Heimann, Dean; Kelsey, Linda; Hulce, Martin.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 284, No. 2 53-2, 01.02.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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