Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs

R. E. Marsh, Z. T. Awad, D. A. Cornet, T. Tomonaga, T. Smyrk, Charles Filipi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim. To determine the usefulness of endoscopically-delivered small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a scaffold in enhancing the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressures. Methods. Six dogs were endoscopically injected - four with the SIS and two with its glycerin carrier. Manometry was performed prior to injection and every four weeks post-op. Results. Adequate and site correct injections were made in four dogs. In one dog, significant augmentation of pressures were obtained at four weeks. None had significant changes in pressure at eight weeks, differences in length at either four or eight weeks or significant differences in the thickness of the examined layers. Four of the six had capillary cushions on pathological examination. The dog injected with the carrier had a loose and disorganised collection, while the others were well organised. Conclusion. SIS is a biologically compatible material. Lack of an animal model for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) makes determining the ability of injections of SIS to combat reflux problematic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-23
Number of pages4
JournalIrish Journal of Medical Science
Volume172
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2003

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Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Dogs
Injections
Pressure
Esophageal Diseases
Manometry
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Glycerol
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Marsh, R. E., Awad, Z. T., Cornet, D. A., Tomonaga, T., Smyrk, T., & Filipi, C. (2003). Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 172(1), 20-23.

Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs. / Marsh, R. E.; Awad, Z. T.; Cornet, D. A.; Tomonaga, T.; Smyrk, T.; Filipi, Charles.

In: Irish Journal of Medical Science, Vol. 172, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 20-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marsh, RE, Awad, ZT, Cornet, DA, Tomonaga, T, Smyrk, T & Filipi, C 2003, 'Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs', Irish Journal of Medical Science, vol. 172, no. 1, pp. 20-23.
Marsh RE, Awad ZT, Cornet DA, Tomonaga T, Smyrk T, Filipi C. Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs. Irish Journal of Medical Science. 2003 Jan;172(1):20-23.
Marsh, R. E. ; Awad, Z. T. ; Cornet, D. A. ; Tomonaga, T. ; Smyrk, T. ; Filipi, Charles. / Endoscopic SIS injection into the lower oesophageal sphincter in dogs. In: Irish Journal of Medical Science. 2003 ; Vol. 172, No. 1. pp. 20-23.
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