Entry of US medical school graduates into family medicine residencies

2006-2007 And 3-year summary

Perry A. Pugno, Gordon T. Schmittling, Amy McGaha, Norman B. Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is the 26th report prepared by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) on the percentage of each US medical school's graduates entering family medicine residency programs. Approximately 8.5% of the 16,110 graduates of US medical schools between July 2005 and June 2006 were first-year family medicine residents in 2006, compared with 8.4% in 2005 and 9.2% in 2004. Medical school graduates from publicly funded medical schools were more likely to be first-year family medicine residents in October 2006 than were residents from privately funded schools, 10.1% compared with 6.0%. The West North Central and the Mountain regions reported the highest percentage of medical school graduates who were first-year residents in family medicine programs in October 2006 at 12.4% and 10.7%, respectively; the New England and Middle Atlantic regions reported the lowest percentages at 5.7% and 5.6%, respectively. Nearly half of the medical school graduates (49.2%) entering a family medicine residency program as first-year residents in October 2006 entered a program in the same state where they graduated from medical school. The percentages for each medical school have varied substantially from year to year since the AAFP began reporting this information. This article reports the average percentage for each medical school for the last 3 years. Also reported are the number and percentage of graduates from colleges of osteopathic medicine who entered Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited family medicine residency programs, based on estimates provided by the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550-561
Number of pages12
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume39
Issue number8
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Internship and Residency
Medical Schools
Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
Family Physicians
Graduate Medical Education
New England
Accreditation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Entry of US medical school graduates into family medicine residencies : 2006-2007 And 3-year summary. / Pugno, Perry A.; Schmittling, Gordon T.; McGaha, Amy; Kahn, Norman B.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 8, 09.2007, p. 550-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pugno, Perry A. ; Schmittling, Gordon T. ; McGaha, Amy ; Kahn, Norman B. / Entry of US medical school graduates into family medicine residencies : 2006-2007 And 3-year summary. In: Family Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 39, No. 8. pp. 550-561.
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