Estimation of the secretion rate of insulin from the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide. Study in obese and diabetic subjects

M. T. Meistas, M. Rendell, S. Margolis, A. A. Kowarski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Direct methods for measuring the secretion rate of insulin are too cumbersome for clinical application. Since C-peptide is secreted in an equimolar ratio with insulin and is excreted into the urine, measuring the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide (U-C) could serve as an indicator if its secretion rate (SR-C) if its urinary clearance (UCI-C) is constant and unaffected by plasma C-peptide concentration, body mass, or diabetes. We measured clearance ratios of C-peptide/ creatinine (CR) in the fasting state and integrated 0-1, 1-3, and 3-5 h after 100 g of glucose p.o. as well as over a full 24-h in eight obese, eight lean, and six maturity-onset diabetic subjects. CR did not differ significantly when values in the fasting state were compared those in the postprandial periods and was therefore unaffected by plasma C-peptides concentration. Furthermore, CR was similar in the lean, obese, and diabetic subjects. SR-C, determined as the product of the metabolic clearance rate of C-peptide and its fasting or integrated plasma concentrations, correlated significantly with U-C in all the subjects (r = 0.87, P <0.0001). The correlation of U-C with SR-C in the diabetic subjects alone was also significant (r = 0.88, P <0.0001). In conclusion, our data support the use of U-C as an indirect measure of SR-C and therefore of SR-I.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-453
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes
Volume31
Issue number5 I
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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C-Peptide
Insulin
Fasting
Creatinine
Postprandial Period
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Urine
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Meistas, M. T., Rendell, M., Margolis, S., & Kowarski, A. A. (1982). Estimation of the secretion rate of insulin from the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide. Study in obese and diabetic subjects. Diabetes, 31(5 I), 449-453.

Estimation of the secretion rate of insulin from the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide. Study in obese and diabetic subjects. / Meistas, M. T.; Rendell, M.; Margolis, S.; Kowarski, A. A.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 31, No. 5 I, 1982, p. 449-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meistas, MT, Rendell, M, Margolis, S & Kowarski, AA 1982, 'Estimation of the secretion rate of insulin from the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide. Study in obese and diabetic subjects', Diabetes, vol. 31, no. 5 I, pp. 449-453.
Meistas, M. T. ; Rendell, M. ; Margolis, S. ; Kowarski, A. A. / Estimation of the secretion rate of insulin from the urinary excretion rate of C-peptide. Study in obese and diabetic subjects. In: Diabetes. 1982 ; Vol. 31, No. 5 I. pp. 449-453.
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