Evaluating ultraviolet (UV) based photochemistry in optically complex coastal waters using the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO)

Fang Cao, Deepak R. Mishra, John Schalles, William L. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Knowledge of light partitioning into different optically active constituents, particularly chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the ultraviolet (UV) is indispensable for understanding UV dependent biogeochemical issues including photochemical processes in optically complex waters. Herein a new approach is presented to investigate photochemistry by blending two ocean color algorithms, namely the composite SeaUV (Cao et al., 2014) and the SeaCDOM (Cao and Miller, 2015) algorithms, and applying them to visible remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) measured using the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO). As illustrated using photochemical carbon monoxide (CO) production from CDOM, this model approach allows high resolution examination of UV optical details with estimates of both depth-specific and depth-integrated photoproduction rates in a dynamic estuarine/coastal environment. Decoupled retrievals of inherent and apparent optical properties (i.e. diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and CDOM absorption coefficient (ag)) using two distinct ocean color algorithms over the entire UV spectrum allow a synoptically dynamic view of CDOM's contribution to light attenuation (ag/Kd). This provides new potential to probe UV processes in complex coastal waters on regional as well as global scales using remote sensing of ocean color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-206
Number of pages8
JournalEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume215
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating ultraviolet (UV) based photochemistry in optically complex coastal waters using the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this