Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula

Brenda L. Gleason, Mark Siracuse, Nader H. Moniri, Christine R. Birnie, Curtis T. Okamoto, Michael A. Crouch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To examine changes in preprofessional pharmacy curricular requirements and trends, and determine rationales for and implications of modifications. Methods. Prerequisite curricular requirements compiled between 2006 and 2011 from all doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs approved by the Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education were reviewed to ascertain trends over the past 5 years. An online survey was conducted of 20 programs that required either 3 years of prerequisite courses or a bachelor's degree, and a random sample of 20 programs that required 2 years of prerequisites. Standardized telephone interviews were then conducted with representatives of 9 programs. Results. In 2006, 4 programs required 3 years of prerequisite courses and none required a bachelor's degree; by 2011, these increased to 18 programs and 7 programs, respectively. Of 40 programs surveyed, responses were received from 28 (70%), 9 (32%) of which reported having increased the number of prerequisite courses since 2006. Reasons given for changes included desire to raise the level of academic achievement of students entering the PharmD program, desire to increase incoming student maturity, and desire to add clinical sciences and experiential coursework to the pharmacy curriculum. Some colleges and schools experienced a temporary decrease in applicants. Conclusions. The preprofessional curriculum continues to evolve, with many programs increasing the number of course prerequisites. The implications of increasing prerequisites were variable and included a perceived increase in maturity and quality of applicants and, for some schools, a temporary decrease in the number of applicants.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume77
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2013

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Curriculum
curriculum
Pharmacy Education
Students
Accreditation
Population Growth
applicant
Interviews
bachelor
maturity
telephone interview
trend
online survey
accreditation
academic achievement
random sample
school
student
science
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gleason, B. L., Siracuse, M., Moniri, N. H., Birnie, C. R., Okamoto, C. T., & Crouch, M. A. (2013). Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(5).

Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula. / Gleason, Brenda L.; Siracuse, Mark; Moniri, Nader H.; Birnie, Christine R.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Crouch, Michael A.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 77, No. 5, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gleason, BL, Siracuse, M, Moniri, NH, Birnie, CR, Okamoto, CT & Crouch, MA 2013, 'Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula', American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, vol. 77, no. 5.
Gleason BL, Siracuse M, Moniri NH, Birnie CR, Okamoto CT, Crouch MA. Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. 2013;77(5).
Gleason, Brenda L. ; Siracuse, Mark ; Moniri, Nader H. ; Birnie, Christine R. ; Okamoto, Curtis T. ; Crouch, Michael A. / Evolution of preprofessional pharmacy curricula. In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. 2013 ; Vol. 77, No. 5.
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