Factors predicting vitamin D response variation in non-hispanic white postmenopausal women

Lan Juan Zhao, Yu Zhou, Fengxiao Bu, Dianne Travers-Gustafson, An Ye, Xiaojing Xu, Lee Hamm, Daniel Michael Gorsage, Xiang Fang, Hong Wen Deng, Robert R. Recker, Joan M. Lappe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: It is well documented that there is wide variation in the response of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] to a given dose of vitamin D supplementation. Understanding factors affecting the response variation is important for identifying subjects who are susceptible to vitamin D deficiency or toxicity. This study aimed to evaluate potential predictors for vitamin D response variation. Design and Participants: A total of 1179 non-Hispanic white postmenopausal women were enrolled into a 4-yr calcium and vitamin D (1100 IU/d) clinical trial. Among them, serum 25(OH)D level of 1063 subjects were measured at both baseline and after 12 months treatment. Vitamin D response was computed for these 1063 subjects as the difference in levels of serum 25(OH)D concentration at the end of a 12-month vitamin D treatment compared with baseline. Stepwise linear regression was used to identify predictors of vitamin D response variation. Results: Increase in vitamin D intake, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, baseline blood collection season, baseline serum calcium level, and baseline body mass index were predictors of vitamin D response variation. These five factors explained 46.8% of the vitamin D response variation in the 1063 subjects. The first three factors [increase in vitamin D intake, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, baseline blood collection season] remained as predictors in the 392 subjects with trial vitamin D supplementation. For the first time, our study indicated that season is an important prediction factor for vitamin D response variation. Subjects who started vitamin D treatment in a cold season (autumn and winter) achieved a significantly higher serum 25(OH)D increase than those started in a hot season (summer) (P <0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggests that the increase in vitamin D supplementation, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, and the season when initiating the vitamin D supplementation can partially predict vitamin D response variation in non-Hispanic postmenopausalwomen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2699-2705
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume97
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

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Vitamin D
Serum
Blood
Calcium
Vitamin D Deficiency
Time and motion study
Linear regression
Linear Models
Toxicity
Body Mass Index
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Factors predicting vitamin D response variation in non-hispanic white postmenopausal women. / Zhao, Lan Juan; Zhou, Yu; Bu, Fengxiao; Travers-Gustafson, Dianne; Ye, An; Xu, Xiaojing; Hamm, Lee; Gorsage, Daniel Michael; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Hong Wen; Recker, Robert R.; Lappe, Joan M.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 97, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 2699-2705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhao, LJ, Zhou, Y, Bu, F, Travers-Gustafson, D, Ye, A, Xu, X, Hamm, L, Gorsage, DM, Fang, X, Deng, HW, Recker, RR & Lappe, JM 2012, 'Factors predicting vitamin D response variation in non-hispanic white postmenopausal women', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 97, no. 8, pp. 2699-2705. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-3401
Zhao, Lan Juan ; Zhou, Yu ; Bu, Fengxiao ; Travers-Gustafson, Dianne ; Ye, An ; Xu, Xiaojing ; Hamm, Lee ; Gorsage, Daniel Michael ; Fang, Xiang ; Deng, Hong Wen ; Recker, Robert R. ; Lappe, Joan M. / Factors predicting vitamin D response variation in non-hispanic white postmenopausal women. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 ; Vol. 97, No. 8. pp. 2699-2705.
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abstract = "Objective: It is well documented that there is wide variation in the response of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] to a given dose of vitamin D supplementation. Understanding factors affecting the response variation is important for identifying subjects who are susceptible to vitamin D deficiency or toxicity. This study aimed to evaluate potential predictors for vitamin D response variation. Design and Participants: A total of 1179 non-Hispanic white postmenopausal women were enrolled into a 4-yr calcium and vitamin D (1100 IU/d) clinical trial. Among them, serum 25(OH)D level of 1063 subjects were measured at both baseline and after 12 months treatment. Vitamin D response was computed for these 1063 subjects as the difference in levels of serum 25(OH)D concentration at the end of a 12-month vitamin D treatment compared with baseline. Stepwise linear regression was used to identify predictors of vitamin D response variation. Results: Increase in vitamin D intake, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, baseline blood collection season, baseline serum calcium level, and baseline body mass index were predictors of vitamin D response variation. These five factors explained 46.8{\%} of the vitamin D response variation in the 1063 subjects. The first three factors [increase in vitamin D intake, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, baseline blood collection season] remained as predictors in the 392 subjects with trial vitamin D supplementation. For the first time, our study indicated that season is an important prediction factor for vitamin D response variation. Subjects who started vitamin D treatment in a cold season (autumn and winter) achieved a significantly higher serum 25(OH)D increase than those started in a hot season (summer) (P <0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggests that the increase in vitamin D supplementation, baseline serum 25(OH)D level, and the season when initiating the vitamin D supplementation can partially predict vitamin D response variation in non-Hispanic postmenopausalwomen.",
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AU - Xu, Xiaojing

AU - Hamm, Lee

AU - Gorsage, Daniel Michael

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AU - Deng, Hong Wen

AU - Recker, Robert R.

AU - Lappe, Joan M.

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