Failed efficacy of ziprasidone in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder

Sriram Ramaswamy, David Driscoll, Lynette M. Smith, Subhash Bhatia, Frederick Petty

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Abstract

Background Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic anxiety disorder that is often difficult to treat. Patients suffering from PTSD often fail to respond to antidepressants and may have a high incidence of positive symptoms of psychosis, though antipsychotic medications have been minimally studied in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the atypical antipsychotic ziprasidone (Geodon) on PTSD symptom clusters, as well as comorbid major depressive disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first completed randomized controlled trial investigating the potential efficacy and tolerability of ziprasidone in patients with chronic PTSD. Methods We conducted a 9-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ziprasidone in 30 patients diagnosed with PTSD and comorbid depression. After screening and randomization, patients completed nine weekly study visits at which treatment safety and efficacy were evaluated. Primary measures of efficacy included total and subscale scores from the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), while the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), and Treatment Outcome PTSD Scale (TOP-8) were implemented as secondary efficacy measures. Results We observed no significant effect of treatment on reduction of PTSD or depression symptoms from pre- to post-treatment. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ziprasidone treatment may not significantly improve symptoms of PTSD or comorbid depression, though further study is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2016

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Depression
Therapeutics
Antipsychotic Agents
ziprasidone
Major Depressive Disorder
Random Allocation
Anxiety Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Antidepressive Agents
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Safety
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology

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Failed efficacy of ziprasidone in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. / Ramaswamy, Sriram; Driscoll, David; Smith, Lynette M.; Bhatia, Subhash; Petty, Frederick.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, Vol. 2, 15.04.2016, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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