Fluid restriction during running increases GI permeability

G. Patrick Lambert, J. Lang, A. Bull, P. C. Pfeifer, Joan Eckerson, C. Moore, Stephen J. Lanspa, J. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability during prolonged treadmill running (60 min at 70% V̇O 2max) with and without fluid intake (3 ml/kg body mass/10 min). Twenty runners (11 males, 9 females; age = 22 ± 3 (SD) yrs; mean V̇O2max = 55.7 ± 5.0 ml/kg/min) completed four experiments: 1) rest, 2) running with no fluid (NF), 3) running with ingestion of a 4% glucose solution (GLU), and 4) running with ingestion of a water placebo (PLA). To determine GI permeability, subjects also drank a solution containing 5 g sucrose (S), 5 g lactulose (L), and 2 g rhamnose (R) immediately prior to each trial. Gastroduodenal permeability was determined by urinary S excretion, while small intestinal permeability was determined by the L/R excretion ratio. Percent body mass loss (i.e., dehydration) was negligible during rest, GLU and PLA, while NF resulted in a 1.5% loss of body mass (p <0.05). Gastroduodenal and intestinal permeability were significantly (p <0.008) increased in NF compared to rest. There were no other differences in GI permeability. These results indicate that fluid restriction during 1 h of steady-state running increases GI permeability above resting levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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Permeability
Eating
Placebos
Lactulose
Glucose
Rhamnose
Dehydration
Sucrose
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Fluid restriction during running increases GI permeability. / Lambert, G. Patrick; Lang, J.; Bull, A.; Pfeifer, P. C.; Eckerson, Joan; Moore, C.; Lanspa, Stephen J.; O'Brien, J.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 194-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lambert, G. Patrick ; Lang, J. ; Bull, A. ; Pfeifer, P. C. ; Eckerson, Joan ; Moore, C. ; Lanspa, Stephen J. ; O'Brien, J. / Fluid restriction during running increases GI permeability. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 194-198.
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