Frequent, low-dose, improved-contrast radiographic images with the use of narrow x-ray beams

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Abstract

Conventional dental radiography uses 60 mm-wide x-ray beams that irradiate the cheeks. To reduce the dose of radiation, months or years can separate serial films and prevent short-term assessment of disease activity. A technique that uses a 13 mm narrow x-ray beam that avoids the cheeks was compared with a wide x-ray beam by using a contrast phantom, a cheek substitute, and a serially sectioned dry mandible. Phantom contrast was measured densitometrically at 50 kVp, 65 kVp, and 90 kVp with wide x-ray beam and narrow x-ray beam and with and without cheek scatter. The narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter technique resulted in better contrast (0.06 to 0.04 OD) than the wide x-ray beam with cheek scatter (0.05 to 0.02 OD). A posterior interdental crest was irradiated and a trabecular rod was removed. The bone detail was best in the images produced with the narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter. The area of the narrow x-ray beam was 4.35% of the area of the wide x-ray beam with approximately 5% of the dose. Short-interval (weekly), very-low-dose radiography should be possible with improved contrast to assess alveolar bone changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-229
Number of pages9
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Cheek
X-Rays
Dental Radiography
Bone and Bones
Mandible
Radiography
Radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Frequent, low-dose, improved-contrast radiographic images with the use of narrow x-ray beams",
abstract = "Conventional dental radiography uses 60 mm-wide x-ray beams that irradiate the cheeks. To reduce the dose of radiation, months or years can separate serial films and prevent short-term assessment of disease activity. A technique that uses a 13 mm narrow x-ray beam that avoids the cheeks was compared with a wide x-ray beam by using a contrast phantom, a cheek substitute, and a serially sectioned dry mandible. Phantom contrast was measured densitometrically at 50 kVp, 65 kVp, and 90 kVp with wide x-ray beam and narrow x-ray beam and with and without cheek scatter. The narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter technique resulted in better contrast (0.06 to 0.04 OD) than the wide x-ray beam with cheek scatter (0.05 to 0.02 OD). A posterior interdental crest was irradiated and a trabecular rod was removed. The bone detail was best in the images produced with the narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter. The area of the narrow x-ray beam was 4.35{\%} of the area of the wide x-ray beam with approximately 5{\%} of the dose. Short-interval (weekly), very-low-dose radiography should be possible with improved contrast to assess alveolar bone changes.",
author = "Douglas Benn",
year = "1992",
doi = "10.1016/0030-4220(92)90387-6",
language = "English",
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journal = "Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology",
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N2 - Conventional dental radiography uses 60 mm-wide x-ray beams that irradiate the cheeks. To reduce the dose of radiation, months or years can separate serial films and prevent short-term assessment of disease activity. A technique that uses a 13 mm narrow x-ray beam that avoids the cheeks was compared with a wide x-ray beam by using a contrast phantom, a cheek substitute, and a serially sectioned dry mandible. Phantom contrast was measured densitometrically at 50 kVp, 65 kVp, and 90 kVp with wide x-ray beam and narrow x-ray beam and with and without cheek scatter. The narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter technique resulted in better contrast (0.06 to 0.04 OD) than the wide x-ray beam with cheek scatter (0.05 to 0.02 OD). A posterior interdental crest was irradiated and a trabecular rod was removed. The bone detail was best in the images produced with the narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter. The area of the narrow x-ray beam was 4.35% of the area of the wide x-ray beam with approximately 5% of the dose. Short-interval (weekly), very-low-dose radiography should be possible with improved contrast to assess alveolar bone changes.

AB - Conventional dental radiography uses 60 mm-wide x-ray beams that irradiate the cheeks. To reduce the dose of radiation, months or years can separate serial films and prevent short-term assessment of disease activity. A technique that uses a 13 mm narrow x-ray beam that avoids the cheeks was compared with a wide x-ray beam by using a contrast phantom, a cheek substitute, and a serially sectioned dry mandible. Phantom contrast was measured densitometrically at 50 kVp, 65 kVp, and 90 kVp with wide x-ray beam and narrow x-ray beam and with and without cheek scatter. The narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter technique resulted in better contrast (0.06 to 0.04 OD) than the wide x-ray beam with cheek scatter (0.05 to 0.02 OD). A posterior interdental crest was irradiated and a trabecular rod was removed. The bone detail was best in the images produced with the narrow x-ray beam without cheek scatter. The area of the narrow x-ray beam was 4.35% of the area of the wide x-ray beam with approximately 5% of the dose. Short-interval (weekly), very-low-dose radiography should be possible with improved contrast to assess alveolar bone changes.

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