Generalized anxiety disorder: Practical assessment and management

Michael G. Kavan, Gary N. Elsasser, Eugene J. Barone

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Generalized anxiety disorder is common among patients in primary care. Affected patients experience excessive chronic anxiety and worry about events and activities, such as their health, family, work, and finances. The anxiety and worry are difficult to control and often lead to physiologic symptoms, including fatigue, muscle tension, restlessness, and other somatic complaints. Other psychiatric problems (e.g., depression) and nonpsychiatric factors (e.g., endocrine disorders, medication adverse effects, withdrawal) must be considered in patients with possible generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy and the first-line pharmacologic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are effective treatments. However, evidence suggests that the effects of cognitive behavior therapy may be more durable. Although complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used, their effectiveness has not been proven in generalized anxiety disorder. Selection of the most appropriate treatment should be based on patient preference, treatment success history, and other factors that could affect adherence and subsequent effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)785-791
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume79
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 2009

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Complementary Therapies
Anxiety Disorders
Cognitive Therapy
Anxiety
Psychomotor Agitation
Muscle Tonus
Family Health
Patient Preference
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Fatigue
Psychiatry
Primary Health Care
Therapeutics
History
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Generalized anxiety disorder : Practical assessment and management. / Kavan, Michael G.; Elsasser, Gary N.; Barone, Eugene J.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 79, No. 9, 01.05.2009, p. 785-791.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kavan, MG, Elsasser, GN & Barone, EJ 2009, 'Generalized anxiety disorder: Practical assessment and management', American Family Physician, vol. 79, no. 9, pp. 785-791.
Kavan, Michael G. ; Elsasser, Gary N. ; Barone, Eugene J. / Generalized anxiety disorder : Practical assessment and management. In: American Family Physician. 2009 ; Vol. 79, No. 9. pp. 785-791.
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