Heme iron polypeptide for the management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease

R. B. Dull, Estella M. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary What is Known and Objective Anaemia is a common clinical finding among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. Iron deficiency is an important contributing factor, and adequate iron supplementation is essential to optimize the management of anaemia of CKD. Oral iron is convenient and inexpensive but is poorly absorbed and associated with gastrointestinal distress. Intravenous iron overcomes these limitations but is more expensive, requires additional clinical visits for administration and is associated with serious adverse events. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects, but data in patients with CKD are limited. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of HIP for the management of CKD. Methods Searches for PubMed (1947-2015) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-2015) were conducted using the following terms: heme iron, heme iron polypeptide, oral iron, anaemia and chronic kidney disease. The bibliography of each relevant article was evaluated for additional studies. Articles were selected for review if they were published in the English language and were randomized controlled trials evaluating the bioavailability, tolerability or efficacy of oral HIP in human subjects with CKD. Results and Discussion This search yielded three clinical studies. The safety and efficacy of HIP was evaluated in a total of 161 subjects with anaemia and various stages of CKD. HIP was consistently associated with lower ferritin values when compared with traditional iron supplementation. With few exceptions, the effect of HIP on haemoglobin, haematocrit, transferrin saturation and recombinant human erythropoietin dose, and adverse effects appeared similar to intravenous and oral non-heme iron supplementation. The cost of HIP is substantially more than non-heme iron and comparable to intravenous iron. What is New and Conclusion Heme iron polypeptide does not appear to confer benefit over traditional iron supplementation among patients with anaemia of CKD and is more expensive. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects but data in CKD patient is limited. A systematic review of the literature revealed 3 clinical trials which evaluated HIP for anemia of CKD. HIP does not appear to confer more benefit than traditional iron supplementation among patients with anemia of CKD and is more expensive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-390
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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Heme
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Anemia
Iron
Peptides
Biological Availability
Dosage Forms
Healthy Volunteers
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heme iron polypeptide for the management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease. / Dull, R. B.; Davis, Estella M.

In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Vol. 40, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 386-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Summary What is Known and Objective Anaemia is a common clinical finding among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. Iron deficiency is an important contributing factor, and adequate iron supplementation is essential to optimize the management of anaemia of CKD. Oral iron is convenient and inexpensive but is poorly absorbed and associated with gastrointestinal distress. Intravenous iron overcomes these limitations but is more expensive, requires additional clinical visits for administration and is associated with serious adverse events. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects, but data in patients with CKD are limited. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of HIP for the management of CKD. Methods Searches for PubMed (1947-2015) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-2015) were conducted using the following terms: heme iron, heme iron polypeptide, oral iron, anaemia and chronic kidney disease. The bibliography of each relevant article was evaluated for additional studies. Articles were selected for review if they were published in the English language and were randomized controlled trials evaluating the bioavailability, tolerability or efficacy of oral HIP in human subjects with CKD. Results and Discussion This search yielded three clinical studies. The safety and efficacy of HIP was evaluated in a total of 161 subjects with anaemia and various stages of CKD. HIP was consistently associated with lower ferritin values when compared with traditional iron supplementation. With few exceptions, the effect of HIP on haemoglobin, haematocrit, transferrin saturation and recombinant human erythropoietin dose, and adverse effects appeared similar to intravenous and oral non-heme iron supplementation. The cost of HIP is substantially more than non-heme iron and comparable to intravenous iron. What is New and Conclusion Heme iron polypeptide does not appear to confer benefit over traditional iron supplementation among patients with anaemia of CKD and is more expensive. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects but data in CKD patient is limited. A systematic review of the literature revealed 3 clinical trials which evaluated HIP for anemia of CKD. HIP does not appear to confer more benefit than traditional iron supplementation among patients with anemia of CKD and is more expensive.",
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N2 - Summary What is Known and Objective Anaemia is a common clinical finding among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. Iron deficiency is an important contributing factor, and adequate iron supplementation is essential to optimize the management of anaemia of CKD. Oral iron is convenient and inexpensive but is poorly absorbed and associated with gastrointestinal distress. Intravenous iron overcomes these limitations but is more expensive, requires additional clinical visits for administration and is associated with serious adverse events. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects, but data in patients with CKD are limited. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of HIP for the management of CKD. Methods Searches for PubMed (1947-2015) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-2015) were conducted using the following terms: heme iron, heme iron polypeptide, oral iron, anaemia and chronic kidney disease. The bibliography of each relevant article was evaluated for additional studies. Articles were selected for review if they were published in the English language and were randomized controlled trials evaluating the bioavailability, tolerability or efficacy of oral HIP in human subjects with CKD. Results and Discussion This search yielded three clinical studies. The safety and efficacy of HIP was evaluated in a total of 161 subjects with anaemia and various stages of CKD. HIP was consistently associated with lower ferritin values when compared with traditional iron supplementation. With few exceptions, the effect of HIP on haemoglobin, haematocrit, transferrin saturation and recombinant human erythropoietin dose, and adverse effects appeared similar to intravenous and oral non-heme iron supplementation. The cost of HIP is substantially more than non-heme iron and comparable to intravenous iron. What is New and Conclusion Heme iron polypeptide does not appear to confer benefit over traditional iron supplementation among patients with anaemia of CKD and is more expensive. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects but data in CKD patient is limited. A systematic review of the literature revealed 3 clinical trials which evaluated HIP for anemia of CKD. HIP does not appear to confer more benefit than traditional iron supplementation among patients with anemia of CKD and is more expensive.

AB - Summary What is Known and Objective Anaemia is a common clinical finding among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. Iron deficiency is an important contributing factor, and adequate iron supplementation is essential to optimize the management of anaemia of CKD. Oral iron is convenient and inexpensive but is poorly absorbed and associated with gastrointestinal distress. Intravenous iron overcomes these limitations but is more expensive, requires additional clinical visits for administration and is associated with serious adverse events. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects, but data in patients with CKD are limited. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of HIP for the management of CKD. Methods Searches for PubMed (1947-2015) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-2015) were conducted using the following terms: heme iron, heme iron polypeptide, oral iron, anaemia and chronic kidney disease. The bibliography of each relevant article was evaluated for additional studies. Articles were selected for review if they were published in the English language and were randomized controlled trials evaluating the bioavailability, tolerability or efficacy of oral HIP in human subjects with CKD. Results and Discussion This search yielded three clinical studies. The safety and efficacy of HIP was evaluated in a total of 161 subjects with anaemia and various stages of CKD. HIP was consistently associated with lower ferritin values when compared with traditional iron supplementation. With few exceptions, the effect of HIP on haemoglobin, haematocrit, transferrin saturation and recombinant human erythropoietin dose, and adverse effects appeared similar to intravenous and oral non-heme iron supplementation. The cost of HIP is substantially more than non-heme iron and comparable to intravenous iron. What is New and Conclusion Heme iron polypeptide does not appear to confer benefit over traditional iron supplementation among patients with anaemia of CKD and is more expensive. Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non-heme iron in healthy subjects but data in CKD patient is limited. A systematic review of the literature revealed 3 clinical trials which evaluated HIP for anemia of CKD. HIP does not appear to confer more benefit than traditional iron supplementation among patients with anemia of CKD and is more expensive.

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