Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)-incidence and etiologies at a regional Children's Hospital in 2001-2006

R. J. Pomajzl, Meera Varman, A. Holst, A. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a serious health concern in children. HUS has primarily been linked to Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, but non-O157 strains are gaining attention. Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure are the characteristics of the syndrome. This study investigated the incidence of HUS at a regional Children's Hospital between 2001 and 2006 by retrospective review. Cases of HUS were investigated for outcomes based on stool culture and an association of acute pancreatitis. A total of 44 cases were identified, of which 57% were female and 43% were male, with an age distribution of 13 months to 17 years and a median age of 3.44 years. Data revealed 13 cases in 2006 compared to two cases in 2001, with 84% of all illnesses occurring in the summer and fall seasons. The median duration of thrombocytopenia was eight days and 50% of all cases required dialysis. E. coli O157:H7 was the predominant pathogen; however, 53% of the cases had unknown etiology. This data may suggest a growing number of cases from 2001 to 2006 and a role for agents other than E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 caused longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay. No association between HUS and acute pancreatitis was found.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1431-1435
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume28
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

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Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome
Escherichia coli O157
Incidence
Thrombocytopenia
Pancreatitis
Hemolytic Anemia
Age Distribution
Acute Kidney Injury
Intensive Care Units
Dialysis
Cohort Studies
Health
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)-incidence and etiologies at a regional Children's Hospital in 2001-2006. / Pomajzl, R. J.; Varman, Meera; Holst, A.; Chen, A.

In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Vol. 28, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 1431-1435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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