Hormones, weight change and menopause

K. M. Davies, R. P. Heaney, Robert R. Recker, M. J. Barger-Lux, Joan M. Lappe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine total body weight change occurring in women at mid-life, specifically with respect to occurrence of menopause and use of estrogen. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of body weight measurements accumulated in two cohorts of healthy women participating in studies of skeletal metabolism. SUBJECTS: Cohort 1: 191 healthy nuns enrolled in a prospective study of osteoporosis risk, aged 35-45 in 1967; cohort 2: 75 women aged 46 or older and still menstruating, enrolled in 1988 in a study of bone cell dynamics across menopause. Roughly one-third of each group received hormone replacement after menopause. MEASUREMENTS: Body weight and height, age, menstrual status and use of estrogen replacement. Cohort 1: 608 measurements at 5 y intervals spanning a period from 17 y before to 22 y after menopause; cohort 2: 1180 measurements at 6-month intervals spanning a period from 5 y prior to 5 y after menopause. RESULTS: In cohort 1 weight rose as a linear function of age (both chronological and menopausal), both before and after cessation of ovarian function, at a rate of ∼0.43% y-1. Neither the menopausal transition nor the use of estrogen had an appreciable effect on this rate of gain. In cohort 2 the rate of gain seemed to diminish slightly at menopause. As with cohort 1, hormone replacement (or its absence) had no appreciable effect on weight. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term, total body weight trajectory at mid-life is not influenced appreciably by either cessation of ovarian function or by hormone replacement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)874-879
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume25
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

menopause
Menopause
hormones
Hormones
Weights and Measures
Body Weight
estrogens
Estrogens
body weight
Body Weight Changes
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Body Height
Osteoporosis
body weight changes
osteoporosis
prospective studies
Prospective Studies
trajectories
Bone and Bones
Rosa

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Davies, K. M., Heaney, R. P., Recker, R. R., Barger-Lux, M. J., & Lappe, J. M. (2001). Hormones, weight change and menopause. International Journal of Obesity, 25(6), 874-879.

Hormones, weight change and menopause. / Davies, K. M.; Heaney, R. P.; Recker, Robert R.; Barger-Lux, M. J.; Lappe, Joan M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 25, No. 6, 2001, p. 874-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, KM, Heaney, RP, Recker, RR, Barger-Lux, MJ & Lappe, JM 2001, 'Hormones, weight change and menopause', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 874-879.
Davies KM, Heaney RP, Recker RR, Barger-Lux MJ, Lappe JM. Hormones, weight change and menopause. International Journal of Obesity. 2001;25(6):874-879.
Davies, K. M. ; Heaney, R. P. ; Recker, Robert R. ; Barger-Lux, M. J. ; Lappe, Joan M. / Hormones, weight change and menopause. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2001 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 874-879.
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